Trade showdown

Farmers hoped for a trade deal. Instead, tariffs went up

Bennett Purser and Kai Ryssdal May 10, 2019
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A farmer holds soybean from the 2018 harvest, on May 5, 2019, at her farm in Scribber, Nebraska, among the top 15 U.S. states exporting to China. JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images
Trade showdown

Farmers hoped for a trade deal. Instead, tariffs went up

Bennett Purser and Kai Ryssdal May 10, 2019
A farmer holds soybean from the 2018 harvest, on May 5, 2019, at her farm in Scribber, Nebraska, among the top 15 U.S. states exporting to China. JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
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The U.S. and China could have struck a deal this week, putting an end to the longstanding trade war between the world’s two largest economies.

Instead, President Trump raised tariffs on more than $200 billion worth of Chinese imports. The rate was raised from 10% to 25%, sending shock though the stock market.

U.S. agriculture has been hit particularly hard by trade tensions. American farmers have been paying retaliatory tariffs to China for soybeans and other crops since last year.

Brian Duncan, who farms hogs, corn and soybeans, is the vice president of the Illinois Farm Bureau. He sat down with the Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal to discuss how trade issues could put many farmers out of business.

“We’ve been given a lot of promises on trade deals and, so far, nothing. Promises don’t pay the bills.”

Brian Duncan, farmer & vice president of the Illinois Farm Bureau

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