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COVID-19

In some isolated rural areas, COVID-19 is hitting hard

Blake Farmer Nov 13, 2020
Heard on: Marketplace Morning Report
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In Tennessee, the National Guard has resumed running weekend drive-thru testing sites in rural communities, where COVID-19 testing is sometimes only available at the local health department. Blake Farmer/WPLN News
COVID-19

In some isolated rural areas, COVID-19 is hitting hard

Blake Farmer Nov 13, 2020
In Tennessee, the National Guard has resumed running weekend drive-thru testing sites in rural communities, where COVID-19 testing is sometimes only available at the local health department. Blake Farmer/WPLN News
HTML EMBED:
COPY

The coronavirus made its mark first in densely populated parts of the United States. And after seven months, rural communities are seeing a rise in cases.

The 13,000 residents of Grundy County, Tennessee, are fairly isolated. Its scenic mountains are home to parks with names like Savage Gulf and Fiery Gizzard. Until recently, residents felt that distance protected them from COVID-19.

“Folks got relaxed,” Mayor Michael Brady said. “They felt like life’s coming back to normality. And, of course, that’s really not the case right now.”

Grundy County has gone from basically no COVID-19 to seven or eight new cases a day — a per capita rate higher than Tennessee’s largest cities.

At first, residents had to drive to another county to get tested. Now the local health department can do it, but the hours are limited.

“At times I’ve had to deploy the sheriff’s department up there to navigate traffic,” Brady said. “They’ll be lined up in the road.”

Across the country, rural counties from South Dakota to South Carolina are now seeing spikes. 

And yet the mindset that distance is enough defense persists, said Jacy Warrell of the Rural Health Association of Tennessee.

“Business as usual is kind of the mantra in a lot of our rural communities,” she said. “There’s still this perception that the spread of COVID is more of an urban issue.”

Rural residents are also facing the pandemic with more risk factors like diabetes, high blood pressure, high rates of obesity, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema and heart disease, according to Dr. Lisa Piercey, Tennessee’s health commissioner.

“So they are not only more likely to contract the disease, but to have worse outcomes,” she said.

And when people get severely ill, help may not be as close as it used to be. In the last decade, more than 120 rural hospitals have closed nationwide, according to the American Hospital Association

Brady, the mayor in Grundy County, Tennessee, said his area doesn’t even have an urgent care.

“We just have the health department,” he said. “Rural Grundy County desperately needs a medical facility.” 

For now, residents are traveling to other counties if they become seriously ill. And some of those hospitals are starting to reach capacity.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What are the details of President Joe Biden’s coronavirus relief plan?

The $1.9 trillion plan would aim to speed up the vaccine rollout and provide financial help to individuals, states and local governments and businesses. Called the “American Rescue Plan,” the legislative proposal would meet Biden’s goal of administering 100 million vaccines by the 100th day of his administration, while advancing his objective of reopening most schools by the spring. It would also include $1,400 checks for most Americans. Get the rest of the specifics here.

What kind of help can small businesses get right now?

A new round of Paycheck Protection Program loans recently became available for pandemic-ravaged businesses. These loans don’t have to be paid back if rules are met. Right now, loans are open for first-time applicants. And the application has to go through community banking organizations — no big banks, for now, at least. This rollout is designed to help business owners who couldn’t get a PPP loan before.

What does the hiring situation in the U.S. look like as we enter the new year?

New data on job openings and postings provide a glimpse of what to expect in the job market in the coming weeks and months. This time of year typically sees a spike in hiring and job-search activity, says Jill Chapman with Insperity, a recruiting services firm. But that kind of optimistic planning for the future isn’t really the vibe these days. Job postings have been lagging on the job search site Indeed. Listings were down about 11% in December compared to a year earlier.

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