COVID-19

Which colleges say they’ll reopen in the fall? And which ones are keeping classes online?

David Brancaccio, Jasmine Garsd, and Alex Schroeder May 20, 2020
Heard on: Marketplace Morning Report
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Notre Dame University said it will be resuming in-person classes this fall. Nova Safo/AFP via Getty Images
COVID-19

Which colleges say they’ll reopen in the fall? And which ones are keeping classes online?

David Brancaccio, Jasmine Garsd, and Alex Schroeder May 20, 2020
Notre Dame University said it will be resuming in-person classes this fall. Nova Safo/AFP via Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
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Colleges and universities are starting to reveal what they’re doing with the fall semester, whether students will be heading back to campus or staying home with online classes.

The California State University system has announced it will remain online. That’s nearly 500,000 students that are going to stay home. Harvard Medical School has also made that decision.

Notre Dame University just said it will be resuming in-person classes. Purdue University expects to go back to in-person instruction as well, and Brown University is considering it.

Among the incentives to reopen is money. Closing down this last semester cost universities billions of dollars.

Location is a big factor. Notre Dame for example, is located in Indiana, which is reopening.

New York University, spread across parts of that hot spot known as Manhattan, plans to reopen, although New York City has not even reopened yet.

NYU is talking about reducing density in student housing, and enforcing social distancing, as well as virus and antibody testing.

Academic schedules will also see changes. Notre Dame, for example, will begin classes two weeks early, so students can be done with the first semester by Thanksgiving, and not have to leave and then return to campus.

A key question in all of this: Will students, parents, professors and staff want to do this?

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What’s going on with extra COVID-19 unemployment benefits?

The latest: President Donald Trump signed an executive action directing $400 extra a week in unemployment benefits. But will that aid actually reach people? It’s still unclear. Trump directed federal agencies to send $300 dollars in weekly aid, taken from the federal disaster relief fund, and called on states to provide an additional $100. But states’ budgets are stretched thin as it is.

What’s the latest on evictions?

For millions of Americans, things are looking grim. Unemployment is high, and pandemic eviction moratoriums have expired in states across the country. And as many people already know, eviction is something that can haunt a person’s life for years. For instance, getting evicted can make it hard to rent again. And that can lead to spiraling poverty.

Which retailers are requiring that people wear masks when shopping? And how are they enforcing those rules?

Walmart, Target, Lowe’s, CVS, Home Depot, Costco — they all have policies that say shoppers are required to wear a mask. When an employee confronts a customer who refuses, the interaction can spin out of control, so many of these retailers are telling their workers to not enforce these mandates. But, just having them will actually get more people to wear masks.

You can find answers to more questions on unemployment benefits and COVID-19 here.

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