COVID-19

Hollywood’s mostly shut down. Except for animation.

Jasmine Garsd May 19, 2020
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Animators didn't have to change much to work from home. Voice-over artists have had to make some adjustments, though. "Nothing messes up a voice-over session like the guy next door trimming his trees with a chainsaw," says Tom Kenny, the voice of SpongeBob SquarePants. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images
COVID-19

Hollywood’s mostly shut down. Except for animation.

Jasmine Garsd May 19, 2020
Heard on:
Animators didn't have to change much to work from home. Voice-over artists have had to make some adjustments, though. "Nothing messes up a voice-over session like the guy next door trimming his trees with a chainsaw," says Tom Kenny, the voice of SpongeBob SquarePants. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images
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Hollywood productions have come to a halt due to COVID-19, and it isn’t clear when they will start again. Some studios have laid off or furloughed hundreds, if not thousands, of workers. But, there is one area of entertainment that is still at work and even hiring: animation.

Douglas Einar Olsen, who directs the show “Rick and Morty” — which is still in production — said animators didn’t have to change that much when they switched to working from home.

“Typically, once we get our marching orders, we just kind of retreat to our little work spaces, hunker down and get the work done over the next week or two,” he said. And cartoons don’t have to worry about filming scenes where characters get up close and personal.

A scene from “Rick and Morty.”

There are some drawbacks to working remotely. 

“You know, if you have a question, like there’s something in the script that’s not making sense, normally I could walk down the hall and pop my head in,” Olsen said. Troubleshooting can take a little longer these days.

But animators’ ability to keep working from home has attracted even live-action shows. Pop TV’s “One Day at a Time” will have an animated episode next month. 

Olsen’s gotten offers lately from brands looking to animate commercials and musicians who want music videos. There are so many, he’s not sure he can take them all. 

He’s not alone.

“We are busier than ever, which is a weird thing to say, and I feel kind of strange about it,” said Chris Prynoski, president of Titmouse, an animation studio. Titmouse produced Netflix’s recent show “The Midnight Gospel,” a trippy cartoon about an alien podcaster who travels the universe with the help of his computer. 

Prynoski said he’s gotten requests from advertisers and musicians too, so he’s trying to hire more than two dozen editors, producers and story artists.

One of the biggest hurdles, though, is voice-overs. 

“I mean, that’s really the concern,” Prynoksi said. “At the end of the day, will it sound like all these characters sound like they’re in the same environment when they are talking to each other or will they sound like one’s in an opera hall and one’s in a closet?”

That’s been a challenge for even the most established voice actors, like Tom Kenny, the voice of SpongeBob SquarePants. Back in March, he had to scramble to build a home studio so he could record himiself. He’s gotten a hang of it he said, but there are still hiccups.

“Nothing messes up a voice-over session like the guy next door trimming his trees with a chainsaw,” he joked.

Tom Kenny voices SpongeBob SquarePants — absorbent and yellow and porous is he.

But Kenny also said he has more work than ever before, which is rare for an actor in Hollywood right now. 

“The people I know who do on-camera work, they’re kinda sitting around and they can’t show up and do what they do,” he said. “Meanwhile, my voice-over friends are saying, ‘Oh, my God. I’m  buried.’”

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What do vaccines mean for economic recovery?

COVID-19 is not going anywhere anytime soon, according to expert witnesses who testified at a recent hearing held by the Joint Economic Committee. Put simply, we can’t eradicate the virus because it infects other species, and there will also be folks who choose not to get the vaccine or don’t mount an immune response, according to Dr. Céline Gounder at NYU School of Medicine & Bellevue Hospital. “That means we can’t only rely on vaccination,” Gounder said. She said the four phases of recovering from the pandemic are ending the emergency, relaxing mitigation measures, getting to herd immunity and having long-term control.

Can businesses deny you entry if you don’t have a vaccine passport?

As more Americans get vaccinated against COVID-19 and the economy begins reopening, some businesses are requiring proof of vaccination to enter their premises. The concept of a vaccine passport has raised ethical questions about data privacy and potential discrimination against the unvaccinated. However, legal experts say businesses have the right to deny entrance to those who can’t show proof.

What do I need to know about tax season this year?

Glad you asked! We have a whole separate FAQ section on that. Some quick hits: The deadline has been extended from April 15 to May 17 for individuals. Also, millions of people received unemployment benefits in 2020 — up to $10,200 of which will now be tax-free for those with an adjusted gross income of less than $150,000. And, for those who filed before the American Rescue Plan passed, simply put, you do not need to file an amended return at the moment. Find answers to the rest of your questions here.

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