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Why the “creative class” is moving away from coastal, metropolitan cities

Daniel Shin and Amy Scott Jul 15, 2019
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A view of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is one of the places the "creative class" is moving to. Brian Bahr/Getty Images

Why the “creative class” is moving away from coastal, metropolitan cities

Daniel Shin and Amy Scott Jul 15, 2019
A view of Salt Lake City, Utah, which is one of the places the "creative class" is moving to. Brian Bahr/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

It’s no secret that some of the places in the country with the most economic opportunity — like Silicon Valley, New York and Washington D.C. — are also some of the most expensive places to live. But that may be convincing a certain kind of worker, members of the so-called “creative class,” to consider living in other parts of the country.

Richard Florida, author of the 2002 book “The Rise of the Creative Class,” recently published some new research about this trend at CityLab. He spoke with Marketplace host Amy Scott about the implications of that demographic shift.

Click the audio player above to hear the interview.

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