Budget shortfalls mean rethinking mass transit funding and strategies

Jan 4, 2021
One way to keep money and transit service moving is to rely more on local taxes and tolls and less on fares.
Washington, D.C.'s Metro rail ridership is down about 86% from 2019. Above, commuters step in and out of a train at the Metro Center station on Dec. 2 in Washington.
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Long distance buses are making a comeback

Jul 31, 2018
When it comes to traveling between major cities, trains, planes and automobiles are the usual go-tos, but buses are beginning to make a comeback. Amid rising gas prices and increasing airfares, companies offering bus services for trips of 200 to 400 miles have sprung up.  Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 
A passenger bus is parked on display at the launch of the German bus company FlixBus on May 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California.
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A city in Central Florida is subsidizing Uber

Mar 25, 2016
No, really. Tax payers' dollars are discounting on-demand rides.

When public transit shuts down

Mar 25, 2016
More and more people are moving to cities and turning to public transit, so what happens when these aging systems can't handle the load of increasing masses?
The BART train travels towards downtown San Francisco.
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