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Cities like Detroit turn to new weapons detection tech to try to prevent gun violence

Aug 11, 2022
The city paid more than $1.3 million for a system it's using to screen people headed to popular gathering spots.
To promote safety, venues are increasingly using to technology that can detect weapons. Above, a fan goes through a security checkpoint before an NFL game in Cleveland.
Jamie Sabau/Getty Images

When governments fail to address community issues, who steps in?

Jul 6, 2022
In an excerpt from "The Fight to Save the Town," the author describes how residents get by in an Oregon county with a declining government.
A person in Detroit walks past the remains of the Packard Motor Car Co., which ceased production in the late 1950s.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Why the U.S. stopped researching gun violence: "It's a thing that has set us back decades"

May 31, 2022
John Woodrow Cox of The Washington Post explains how a 1996 legal provision effectively halted research on gun violence.
Flowers and crosses memorialize the 19 children and two teachers killed in a shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24.
Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Capitalism's response to school shootings

Apr 5, 2021
In his new book, "Children Under Fire," John Woodrow Cox writes about how gun violence affects children and the nearly $3 billion market for school security.
Kindergarten students during a lockdown drill in Hawaii in 2003.
Phil Mislinski/Getty Images

Congress is funding gun violence research again for the first time in 20 years

Jan 22, 2020
Researchers at the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health will split $25 million dollars.
Brandon Wexler demonstrates for a customer at a store in Delray Beach, Florida, in 2016.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Pennsylvania tries a new initiative to curb illegal gun purchases

Sep 11, 2019
Operation LIPSTICK (Ladies Involved in Putting a Stop to Inner-City Killing), reaches out to women and teenage girls to warn them about the risks of making straw purchases — up to ten years in prison under federal law.
Dorothy Johnson-Speight holds a picture of her son, Khaaliq. He was fatally shot in Philadelphia in 2001 by a neighbor who was a convicted felon and should not have been able to own a gun.
Miles Bryan for Marketplace

What we don't know about gun violence

Oct 6, 2017
And how funding for gun violence research could make a difference.
Semi-automatic rifles are seen for sale in a gun shop in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 4, 2017. 
ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

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Can Chicago’s recent plague of violence be cured?

Sep 16, 2016
A look at the cities’ rise in violence as a symptom of economic inequality.
A young victim of Chicago's gun violence is laid to rest. 

The demand for protective gear

Dec 7, 2015
In the wake of mass-shootings, body armor sellers say sales are up.
A book and the back of a child's backpack are displayed with the effects of bullets that were shot through it without Amendment II's Rynohide CNT Shield. Products like these have seen sales increase dramatically in the wake of violent attacks.
George Frey/Getty Images

More programs train workers to respond to a shooter

Dec 4, 2015
The growth of workplace violence has increased demand for safety programs.
Participants barricade a door of a classroom to block an 'active shooter' during ALICE (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter and Evacuate) training at the Harry S. Truman High School in Levittown, Pennsylvania, on November 3, 2015. ALICE is designed to educate local and school-based law enforcement, as well as administrators, teachers and others about the research-based, proactive response approach to violent Intruder events.
JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images