Lapse in Fed lending programs could cost companies hurt by COVID

Companies hurt by the pandemic could end up paying investors a full percentage point more in interest to buy their bonds.
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell testify during the Senate's Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs hearing examining the quarterly CARES Act report to Congress on Sept. 24, 2020, in Washington.
Drew Angerer/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

After a 3-month borrowing spree, corporations put the brakes on more debt

Jul 6, 2020
Some borrow less because they're optimistic, some because they're pessimistic and some because they're cautious.
A face mask hangs on a fence outside the New York Stock Exchange. Corporate borrowing has slowed as companies reconsider the economic future.
Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

The Fed starts buying corporate bonds

Jun 16, 2020
The Federal Reserve is buying a broad cross-section of bonds to make sure firms have the money they need to weather the COVID-19 pandemic.
A trader walks by the New York Stock Exchange. The Federal Reserve has begun buying corporate bonds as part of the CARES Act.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

What are ETFs and why is the Fed pouring billions into them?

May 12, 2020
The Federal Reserve is prepared to invest hundreds of billions of dollars in corporate bond ETFs to support businesses, and make it possible for these businesses to borrow during the Coronavirus downturn.
Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Bank earnings skid on edgy markets

Jan 15, 2019
JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup are reporting weaker than expected earnings this week. Market volatility may have contributed to this as clients shy away from trading, which is a big part of banks’ business these days. Click the audio player above to hear the full story.