👀 Noticed fewer chips in the bag? Fewer squares in your TP? Share your "shrinkflation" stories.

In a world where millions work from home, what does it mean to be injured “on the job”?

Jan 24, 2023
The amount of workers mostly working at home has tripled over the past several years, blurring the line of what constitutes a “workplace.”
“One thing about workers’ comp — and I've been doing it for almost 50 years — is every time I think I've seen every possible way somebody could possibly get hurt, I'm surprised there’s another way,” says attorney Alan Pierce.
PeopleImages/Getty Images

Frustrated air travelers seek payback from Australian airlines

Nov 30, 2022
Whether or not they can actually get it is another matter.
People arrive to check-in at the Qantas domestic terminal at Sydney Airport on August 25, 2022 in Sydney, Australia.
Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images

Small business pessimism abounds

May 11, 2021
The National Federation of Independent Business has called small-business owners' outlook "surprisingly glum."
As businesses reopen, many small businesses worry they won't be able to compete to larger ones when it comes to hiring.
doble-d via Getty Images

PG&E ties compensation of victims to its future through stock

Apr 1, 2021
PG&E equipment caused the Camp Fire and other deadly blazes. What does it mean for victims when the settlement depends on profitability?
Victims of wildfires caused by PG&E equipment wonder how owning the company's stock will compensate them for their lost and damaged homes.
Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

When coal miners can't breathe, getting compensation is an uphill legal battle

Sep 2, 2020
In his new book, journalist Chris Hamby describes miners' struggles to receive the health benefits they've been promised.
A coal worker near Welch, West Virginia, in 2017. Miners who are stricken with black lung disease often face obstacles in their efforts to receive benefits.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Pay cuts spreading beyond executive suite

Apr 2, 2020
Cuts to pay can save jobs, but they can hurt morale, too.
As pay cuts spread further down from the executive suite, they hit average workers harder. Above, cashiers wearing protective masks work in a grocery store in Brooklyn on April 2.
Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

Undocumented workers in Wyoming struggle to get workers' comp

Apr 8, 2019
Wyoming is the state with the most dangerous workplaces.
Attorney Steven Dwyer said more undocumented workers are seeking his help with cases related to workers' compensation for on-the-job injuries, including one worker who is $17,000 in debt from medical bills incurred after he fell off a roof.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

For public good, not for profit.

White House pushes rosier wage-growth measure

Sep 6, 2018
A Council of Economic Advisers report argues Americans’ inflation-adjusted compensation is rising more than wage data in the monthly jobs report show.

Bonuses aren't just for bankers anymore

Nov 9, 2015
Looking to cut costs, companies are turning to incentive pay over raises.