Retailers are in “unprecedented times,” too
Jun 7, 2022

Retailers are in “unprecedented times,” too

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Retailers bet that consumers could keep up their goods shopping spree and lost. Plus, a boost for American solar manufacturers and online schooling's staying power.

Segments From this episode

Airlines might be banking on your premium seat upgrade

Jun 7, 2022
Would you pay an additional $60 for extra legroom? Airlines are betting that you just might.
Carriers hope travelers will pay up for a little more comfort.
Cooper Neill/AFP via Getty Images

Virtual school evolves, even as the pandemic wanes

Jun 7, 2022
What once was a necessity is now an expanding educational frontier.
Virtual learning used to be less dynamic, with students and teachers accessing materials at different times. The pandemic changed that.
Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Retailers have an inventory problem as lockdown lifestyle fades

Jun 7, 2022
As inflation hits and consumers abandon pandemic spending habits, Target and others have the wrong kind of stuff on their hands.
The home goods section at a Target store. Now that consumers are getting out and about, stores are left with too much inventory.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Biden moves to restore stability of U.S. solar industry

Jun 7, 2022
The president also ruled out solar tariffs for two years on several Asian countries the U.S. imports solar panels from.
Chinese workers producing parts for solar panels. The U.S. has been investigating whether Southeast Asian nations have been laundering Chinese panels, which carry U.S. import tariffs.
STR/AFP via Getty Images

The dollar's strong right now. That's a problem for American companies doing business abroad.

Jun 7, 2022
But it's great for Americans who want to buy imports.
A strong U.S. dollar is great for Americans who want to buy foreign products. For American companies that sell products abroad? Not so much.
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Can winemakers salvage grapes tainted by wildfire smoke?

Jun 7, 2022
Scientists are looking at ways to determine if grapes from smoky areas can still be used, without adding an unpleasant ashy taste to wine.
Phil Crews at his Pelican Ranch Winery in Scotts Valley. Crews, an organic chemist at UC Santa Cruz, showed that a method pioneered in Australia can detect smoke's impact on California wines.
Jerimiah Oetting/KAZU News

Music from the episode

Drifting Maverick Sabre
Philodendron Fields Monster Rally
Sound Is Vibration Atmosphere
Easy Son Lux
Heartbreaker Crazy P

The team

Nancy Farghalli Executive Producer
Daisy Palacios Senior Producer
Sean McHenry Associate Producer
Andie Corban Associate Producer
Richard Cunningham Associate Producer