What have you always wondered about the economy? Tell us
Sep 7, 2016

Marketplace for Wednesday, September 7, 2016

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Today we've got: a new iPhone, but no headphone jack; record high job openings, but no raises to match; and a bunch of car loans, but a lot of subprime borrowers. We'll break it all down, plus: the cost of criminalizing disability.

Segments From this episode

Just how healthy is the auto loan industry?

Sep 7, 2016
Experian says borrowers are "very prime," but not everyone agrees.
The delinquency rate on car loans is up slightly but subprime car loans are shrinking. 
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

Apple does away with the headphone jack

Sep 7, 2016
Get your dongles ready.
Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller announces AirPods during a launch event on September 7, 2016 in San Francisco, California. 
Stephen Lam/Getty Images

The cost of criminalizing disability

Sep 7, 2016
Who pays the price for a lack of community-based services?
An artist's portrayal of Kevin Matthews a mentally disabled man that was shot by police in Dearborn, Michigan.
Micah Bazant/micahbazant.com

Economist Paul Krugman ponders the sci-fi economics of 'Star Trek'

Sep 7, 2016
What the TV series can teach us about our visions of the future.
 A USS Enterprise bridge stage set is displayed during a press preview of "40 Years of Star Trek: The Collection" at Christie's auction house September 29, 2006, in New York City.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Lego sales flatten out, but everything is still awesome

Sep 7, 2016
The brickmaker puts the brakes on growth after global demand outstrips supply.
Toys are a fickle industry — here today, gone tomorrow, but Lego seems to have cracked the code.
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Meet the new 'Most Interesting Man in the World'

Sep 7, 2016
The new guy is a lot like the old guy, but younger and bilingual.
Meet the new guy.
Screenshot via Dos Equis

Record-high job openings but no wage gains to match

Sep 7, 2016
Even as the labor market tightens, employers aren't offering higher salaries to get the workers they need.
Employers advertised a record 5.9 million job openings in July.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Today we’ve got: a new iPhone, but no headphone jack; record high job openings, but no raises to match; and a bunch of car loans, but a lot of subprime borrowers. We’ll break it all down, plus: the cost of criminalizing disability.