Marketplace for Tuesday, March 8, 2016
Mar 8, 2016

Marketplace for Tuesday, March 8, 2016

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United airlines is facing more turbulence, the FCC is eyeing broadband subsidies, and Japan is running out of people to care for its elderly population — are robots the answer?

Segments From this episode

Japan's long-term care dilemma: Immigrants or robots?

Mar 8, 2016
With more young people in the workforce, who will take care of an aging population?
Is this the future of senior care? Japan thinks it may be. 
Sally Herships

United's stock isn't soaring, and hedge funds are on the attack

by
Mar 8, 2016
There's turbulence in the friendly skies as investors and management battle for control.
An employee walks through the United Airlines terminal at Newark Liberty Airport on July 8, 2015 in Newark, New Jersey.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Oil workers say their pay was stolen before the bust

Mar 8, 2016
New lawsuits claim companies didn't pay earned wages and overtime.
A truck used to carry sand for fracking is washed in a truck stop on February 4, 2015 in Odessa, Texas.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

What happened to all those foreclosed homes?

Mar 8, 2016
Foreclosures are down, but home ownership isn't back up. What gives?
People dress as foreclosed homes during a protest in 2012 in New York.
TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

The secret to a perfect basketball team is data

Mar 8, 2016
You don't come across a Steph Curry every day, but teams are trying to make their own.
Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors reacts after making a three-point basket against the Oklahoma City Thunder at ORACLE Arena on March 3, 2016 in Oakland, California.
Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

FCC proposes broadband subsidies for low-income households

Mar 8, 2016
Low-income users would get $9.25 per month under the agency's plan.
FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn Commissioner speaks at a panel discussion at the Kaiser Family Foundation on November 4, 2015 in Washington, DC.
Photo by Larry French/Getty Images for Common Sense Media

Japan's bonds are worth basically nothing — or less

Mar 8, 2016
You can make less than half a percent over 30 years for loaning the government money.
A man looks at a screen showing global stock market information on the street in Tokyo on August 25, 2015. 
Chris McGrath/Getty Images

United airlines is facing more turbulence, the FCC is eyeing broadband subsidies, and Japan is running out of people to care for its elderly population — are robots the answer?

Music from the episode