Sep 11, 2014

Marketplace for Thursday, September 11, 2014

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The NFL is arguably the country’s most powerful sports league. We look at the wide range of NFL corporate tie-ins and business interests that make this behemoth a multibillion-dollar concern. Plus, the SEC is going after…

Stories From this episode

On that three-day congressional workweek

Sep 10, 2014
All of the business in Washington is a lot to tackle in three days.
American Futures

Allentown bets big to shed its former image

Sep 11, 2014
Pennsylvania's third largest city has been dying for decades. Can it build itself back to life?
More than 700 construction workers toil away around the clock in the last two weeks before downtown Allentown’s new hockey arena, the PPL Center, opens. This view is from developer J.B. Reilly’s office.
Tommy Andres/Marketplace

The tricky balance of marketing to the affluent

Sep 11, 2014
Spending is different for the wealthy, and that means getting them to spend is, too.

The NFL's power extends beyond the game

Sep 11, 2014
The league makes billions through a wide network of tie-ins with big corporations.

Twitter taps the bond market

Sep 11, 2014
Near-zero interest rates have Twitter turning to bonds to raise cash.

Why the SEC is all about 'broken windows'

Sep 11, 2014
The SEC employs an enforcement strategy coined in the 1980s.
Final Note

Goodbye, handshake. Hello, fist bump!

Sep 11, 2014
Forget sneezing into your elbow.

The NFL is arguably the country’s most powerful sports league. We look at the wide range of NFL corporate tie-ins and business interests that make this behemoth a multibillion-dollar concern. Plus, the SEC is going after the small fry. As part of its “broken windows” policy, it’s fining companies and individuals for small infractions and reaping small sums. But this is about more than just reminding Wall Street that the SEC is out there. It’s about showing how the agency, and its attitude toward enforcement, has changed under new management. Also, Twitter goes to the bond market in an effort to raise as much as $1.5 billion. This is likely an attempt to build up its advertising business, but Twitter remains unprofitable and borrowing is cheap. So what does this tell us about the economy?

Music from the episode

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