Nov 24, 2011

Marketplace for Thursday, November 24, 2011

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Safe to say the table is not the only place to find turkeys these days. The world economy is full of them -- from stock market madness to the lack of jobs, and debt problems in Europe. We explore why markets were unimpressed by a new plan to help the eurozone crisis. And this Thanksgiving holiday, we look at why grocery stores are staying open -- and tell you what foods are cheaper to make at home. Plus, Starbucks is brewing up a plan for job creation, and our commentary series "Writers on Work" wraps up.

Segments From this episode

Grocers hope to cash in on last-minute Thanksgiving shopping

Nov 24, 2011
The hours leading up to Thanksgiving are considered the busiest grocery-shopping time of the year. So, some grocers are hoping to capitalize by staying open.

Financial markets unimpressed by EU treaties plan

Nov 24, 2011
Critics say a plan proposed by leaders of Germany, France and Italy to modify European Union treaties won't help with the immediate crisis.

Wilkerson: Writers on Work

Nov 24, 2011
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Isabel Wilkerson, discusses how she writes about work. Her latest book is called "The Warmth of Other Suns."

'Make the Bread, Buy the Butter'

Nov 24, 2011
We learn what's cheaper -- and tastier -- to make at home and what you should just buy from the grocery store.
Homemade bagels are cheaper than store-bought ones. Jam and butter, just buy at the store.
Tess Vigeland/Marketplace

Audubon Society hopes to fly high with rebrand

Nov 24, 2011
So, how to appeal to a new generation of bird watcher? The Audubon Society goes for a rebrand.

A national sales tax on Black Friday purchases?

Nov 24, 2011
Cornell economics professor Robert Frank is proposing a national sales tax on all purchases made between 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day and 6 a.m. on the following Friday. Would you support it?
Home Depot advertises Black Friday sales on its website.
homedepot.com

Starbucks aims for job creation with new program

Nov 24, 2011
Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz discusses how the coffee company is going to tackle the U.S. jobs problem by helping finance microloans to American small businesses.
Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz speaks at an event in New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Safe to say the table is not the only place to find turkeys these days. The world economy is full of them — from stock market madness to the lack of jobs, and debt problems in Europe. We explore why markets were unimpressed by a new plan to help the eurozone crisis. And this Thanksgiving holiday, we look at why grocery stores are staying open — and tell you what foods are cheaper to make at home. Plus, Starbucks is brewing up a plan for job creation, and our commentary series “Writers on Work” wraps up.

Music from the episode

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