Sep 29, 2006

Marketplace PM for September 29, 2006

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Segments From this episode

Taking a (tax) break in Puerto Rico

Sep 29, 2006
A great example of how companies are getting even more creative looking for tax breaks? The pharmaceutical industry's presence in Puerto Rico. Kai Ryssdal talks about it with Jill Barshay of Congressional Quarterly.

Columbia alums, get out your wallets

Sep 29, 2006
Columbia University is starting a $4 billion capital campaign — the largest ever in American higher education. But even larger campaigns are expected to be announced soon. Ashley Milne-Tyte reports.

Brazil's economy still in the black market

Sep 29, 2006
Brazil's voters are expected to reelect President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva on Sunday. The country is enjoying moderate growth, but much of its economy is still off the books. Paulo Prada reports.

Inflation's up, consumer spending down

Sep 29, 2006
The government released some worrisome economic data. August's core inflation, which excludes food and energy prices, posted the biggest year-over-year increase in more than a decade. And consumer spending was down. Janet Babin reports.

Maybe there's some benefit to Medicare plan

Sep 29, 2006
When Medicare launched its new drug benefit a year ago, critics predicted horror story scenarios. But new details released by the Bush administration have Medicare officials doing a victory dance. Helen Palmer reports.

Making it easier to find pension costs

Sep 29, 2006
The agency that sets U.S. accounting rules has issued new requirements for corporations to state pension liabilities on their balance sheets. Marketplace's Amy Scott reports.

For senators, pride goeth before the fall election

Sep 29, 2006
Commentator Jeff Birnbaum says he's skeptical that members of the Senate will open their campaign finances to scrutiny on the Internet — though they have no problem requiring it for others.