May 14, 2007

Marketplace PM for May 14, 2007

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Segments From this episode

Small magazines gird for postage hike

May 14, 2007
A first-class postage stamp rose 2 cents to 41 cents today. One rate that didn't go up today but will in July is for mailing periodicals. Jeremy Hobson reports that for some small magazines it's a welcome delay.

Immigration reform has foes on both sides

May 14, 2007
Conventional wisdom is that with Democrats in control of Congress, President Bush could well get a new immigration law. But commentator Jeff Birnbaum says the Democrats aren't so eager for change.

Health insurance weighs heavier on small biz

May 14, 2007
Finding, keeping and affording health insurance is a big headache for small businesses. Steve Tripoli reports on the challenge faced by a company he's been watching for years.

Daimler pays big to unload Chrysler

May 14, 2007
Nine years after acquiring Chrysler, Daimler is spending $650 million just to get somebody to take the car company off its hands. Kai Ryssdal totals it up.

Chrysler workers ride with Cerberus

May 14, 2007
UAW chief Ron Gettelfinger originally opposed the Daimler-Cerberus deal for Chrysler, but he had a striking change of heart. Amy Scott reports.

Where's the value in Chrysler?

May 14, 2007
What does Cerberus Capital Management see in Chrysler? Kai Ryssdal talks with The New York Times' Micheline Maynard about where profits may lie.

Bush calls for alternative fuel plans

May 14, 2007
President Bush has directed his cabinet to come up with rules that would lead to a 20% cut in gasoline use in the United States within 10 years. John Dimsdale reports.

The high price of online eavesdropping

May 14, 2007
Cable, DSL and voice-over-Internet companies are now required to let the government tap into people's Internet communications. It's an expensive proposition. Ashley Milne-Tyte reports.