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Jul 20, 2006

Marketplace PM for July 20, 2006

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Segments From this episode

Putting bought women on the shelves

Jul 20, 2006
Bookstore worker and commentator Moira Manion is a bit worried about what women are reading these days.

A roadster that's electric

Jul 20, 2006
Los Angeles Times car critic Dan Neil reports that the new Tesla proves the electric car is alive and well — and very fast!

Mad cow testing scaled back

Jul 20, 2006
The Department of Agriculture isn't too worried about mad cow disease. It's sharply cutting the number of cattle it tests. Helen Palmer reports.

Human kidneys for sale

Jul 20, 2006
The black market for kidneys in India is swelling as the poor trade their organs for cash. For Marketplace and public television's Frontline/World, Samantha Grant filed this dispatch from India.

SEC, prosecutors file stock-option charges

Jul 20, 2006
Brocade Communications, a Silicon Valley company you've probably never heard of, has become Exhibit A in the backdated stock option scandal. The company's former CEO was hit with civil and criminal charges today. John Dimsdale reports.

The 'Way Forward' looks a ways off

Jul 20, 2006
Ford Motor Company announced today it lost more than $120 million last quarter. Amy Scott reports on the continuing problems at the nation's second-largest automaker.

Who is coming to Lebanon's aid?

Jul 20, 2006
As the battle between Israel and Hezbollah continues, Lebanon faces a growing humanitarian crisis. Hillary Wicai reports that getting aid on the ground will be a tricky thing.

No charges against Bonds, just doubts

Jul 20, 2006
Federal prosecutors announced today they won't indict major leaguer Barry Bonds for perjury or tax evasion. But, business-of-sports analyst Ed Derse tells Kai Ryssdal, the story isn't about taxes. It's about steroids.