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Marketplace PM for December 28, 2006
Dec 28, 2006

Marketplace PM for December 28, 2006

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Segments From this episode

Cloned food called safe, but is it desirable?

Dec 28, 2006
Food from cloned animals poses no risk, so warning labels aren't justified, according to the FDA. Still, consumers don't seem to have an appetite for it. Helen Palmer reports.

If Jobs is tainted, does Apple lose its shine?

Dec 28, 2006
Whether Steve Jobs was in on Apple's stock options scandal has yet to be determined. But as Janet Babin reports, it may not matter to the company's profits.

Just how shakey is our connection?

Dec 28, 2006
As we saw this week in Taiwan, damage to a few small cables can knock large regions off the Internet. Could that happen in the U.S.? Host Bob Moon talks with communications consultant Frank Dzubeck.

YouTube 2006: A bit of Napster revisited

Dec 28, 2006
Just as Napster shook up the recording industry several years ago, YouTube is giving TV and the movie biz a clearer picture of online video's future. Host Bob Moon talks with Lisa Napoli about how what's old is new again.

Now, about that bonus . . .

Dec 28, 2006
It's been an especially bountiful bonus season on Wall Street, with record year-end payouts to the brokers and bankers. And as Amy Scott reports, there are other folks waiting to share the wealth.

'Bare Fares' aren't the ticket to success

Dec 28, 2006
United is considering stripping away services that passengers now take for granted. Travel commentator Christopher Elliott says charging people extra to check their bags will only leave the airline exposed.

For the love of a green card

Dec 28, 2006
Marriage fraud rings in four states made a good, if illegal, business out of getting U.S. citizens married to immigrants in search of green cards. Ramy Inocencio reports.