Aug 28, 2006

Marketplace PM for August 28, 2006

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Segments From this episode

SEC doing enough to fight insider trading?

Aug 28, 2006
It's back to '80s, at least when it comes to corporate mergers. A New York Times report says these big deals may mean a lot of insider trading. Host Scott Jagow speaks to Columbia University professor John Coffee.

Did the Steagles save the NFL?

Aug 28, 2006
During WWII, the Pittsburgh Steelers and Philadelphia Eagles fielded a team together for a season: the Steagles. Host Scott Jagow speaks to author Matthew Algeo about how the combined team helped keep the NFL going at a critical time.

Repowering New Orleans

Aug 28, 2006
Electric utility Entergy serves the Gulf Coast from Texas to Mississippi. Last year's hurricanes took out a huge chunk of the grid and destroyed nearly $2 billion in equipment. Can they repair in one year what it took decades to…

FEC considers new rules for political TV ads

Aug 28, 2006
The Federal Election Commission could make a major change to the nation's campaign finance laws that would change the way political ads are funded. Scott Tong reports.

China putting $5 billion into Venezuelan oil

Aug 28, 2006
Venezuela's energy minister said today that China will invest $5 billion on Venezuela's oil infrastructure. That mirrors a worldwide trend as China taps more oil from foreign sources. Jeff Tyler reports.

Google eyes Microsoft's market

Aug 28, 2006
The search engine giant is out with yet another new product and this one's going after a market where Microsoft is currently king. Can Google Apps lure away small to mid-size businesses? Janet Babin checks it out.

Survival for sale

Aug 28, 2006
Tomorrow is the first anniversary of Hurricane Katrina's landfall on the coast of Louisiana. Commentator Marcellus Andrews argues that the human suffering after the storm shows the major flaws in our economic system.