Sep 17, 2012

Marketplace for Monday, September 17, 2012

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China and the United States have filed complaints against one another with the World Trade Organization, so what does that mean for global business? Plus, the Chicago teachers' strike is slogging onward, but at least one suburb is still going to class. We look at what kind of damage a shortage in the critical gas helium is doing for health care and the military (not just birthday parties). And it's Sports Monday here at Marketplace as Mark Garrison looks at the NHL lockout, and Zachary Barr inspects golf's recent -- but sharp -- slide down the hole.

Segments From this episode

Fourth richest woman in the U.S. has an unusual celebrity connection

Sep 17, 2012
Can you guess who was Elaine Tettemer Marshall's mother-in-law?

Golf tries to bring players back on course

Sep 17, 2012
Long a staple of business networking, golf is on the decline. It's lost five million players in the last 10 years, but now it's making some changes to bring golfers back to the course.

China's export strategy prompts a U.S. trade complaint

Sep 17, 2012
China rewards companies for exporting auto parts to other countries, so the U.S. files a complaint with the World Trade Organization, its 15th against China.

U.S. companies roll with turmoil in Egypt

Sep 17, 2012
Some businesses see little impact of current unrest on long-term business strategy in Egypt.

Chicago area school stages strike workaround

Sep 17, 2012
Lake Forrest High School in suburban Chicago is fighting its own striking teachers by running the school without them.

The science (and business) of sowing seeds

Sep 17, 2012
Author Janisse Ray talks about her new book "The Seed Underground," which explores why many farmers today aren't using the seeds their grandfathers used.

Occupy's impact on a business leader and a protester

Sep 17, 2012
Occupy returns to Wall Street. On its one year anniversary, a protester and a business leader reflect -- together-- on how the movement has changed them.

Hockey lockout, again, hurts small businesses

Sep 17, 2012
The second NHL lockout in less than a decade threatens to hurt small businesses in and around hockey arenas.

Helium shortage causes prices to balloon

Sep 17, 2012
Helium is an abundant element that's vital to high-tech products. But slack production is causing a shortage, and that has helium prices ballooning.

China and the United States have filed complaints against one another with the World Trade Organization, so what does that mean for global business? Plus, the Chicago teachers’ strike is slogging onward, but at least one suburb is still going to class. We look at what kind of damage a shortage in the critical gas helium is doing for health care and the military (not just birthday parties). And it’s Sports Monday here at Marketplace as Mark Garrison looks at the NHL lockout, and Zachary Barr inspects golf’s recent — but sharp — slide down the hole.

Music from the episode

True Thrush Dan Deacon

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