Feb 1, 2016

Marketplace for Monday, February 1, 2016

HTML EMBED:
COPY

Breaking down the billions in Alphabet's earnings report; how lead may be the biggest childhood epidemic in the country; and the latest installment of "I've Always Wondered," looking at what happens when your water goes down the drain.

 

Segments From this episode

The underground story of what happens to wastewater

Feb 1, 2016
Conserving water in drought areas actually makes treating wastewater more difficult.
 A wastewater treatment plant is inundated by the Yazoo River floodwaters near Yazoo City, Mississippi.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Bill Gates said he used to memorize his employees' license plates

Feb 1, 2016
A weird way to keep track of productivity...
Gates used to keep a close eye on his employees, but that was way back then. 
TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images

How is the Porter Ranch gas leak impacting residents?

Feb 1, 2016
Porter Ranch residents weigh in on the challenges the gas leak presents.

Lead may be the biggest childhood epidemic in the U.S.

Feb 1, 2016
The lead problem in America doesn't stop at Flint's city limits.
Tears stream down the face of Morgan Walker, age 5 of Flint, as she gets her finger pricked for a lead screening on January 26, 2016 at Eisenhower Elementary School in Flint Michigan.
Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

At Cornell, bigger is better for business

Feb 1, 2016
Why the university is combining three schools into one College of Business
Sage Hall at Cornell University, where the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management is located.
Robert Thompson/Flickr

Alphabet delivers its first earnings report

Feb 1, 2016
Senior tech correspondent Molly Wood on what to look for for the Google holding company.

How 'cash on hand' gives insight to campaign strategy

Feb 1, 2016
Campaigns sent their latest numbers to the Federal Election Commission Sunday.
Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz speaks during a campaign event at the Johnson County Fairgrounds January 31, 2016 in Iowa City, Iowa.
Joshua Lott/Getty Images

New interest in area where black business once thrived

Feb 1, 2016
An overpass stands where businesses once stood; now residents are trying to get rid of it.
An overpass stands in the neighborhood that was once filled with thriving black businesses, and the iconic Union Station, that was torn down. 
Gabrielle Ware

Breaking down the billions in Alphabet’s earnings report; how lead may be the biggest childhood epidemic in the country; and the latest installment of “I’ve Always Wondered,” looking at what happens when your water goes down the drain.

 

Music from the episode

Get Right Jennifer Lopez
Remember The Name Onra