Aug 6, 2012

Marketplace for Monday, August 6, 2012

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Best Buy hasn't fared well in the recession and now its founder is offering nearly $9 million to buy out the company. The Curiosity Rover has successfully landed on Mars -- are humans the red planet's next arrival? Harvard is considering canceling subscriptions to costly academic journals. In New York City, scavengers are stealing cardboard scraps and making millions. Kai Ryssdal talks to sports agent Evan Morgenstein about turning Olympic amateur athletes into sponsored, money-making machines. And we take a look at the metaphors we use to describe the economy.

Segments From this episode

Shannon Eastin will be first female official in an NFL game

Aug 6, 2012
She'll be on the field Thursday night when the Green Bay Packers play the San Diego Chargers.

The cost of living...on Mars

Aug 6, 2012
The Curiosity Rover's successful landing got us wondering: Just how much would it cost to live on the Red Planet?

Economy squeezes Harvard spending

Aug 6, 2012
Even elite universities like Harvard, with a $32 billion endowment, are reducing expenses. Among the cuts? Faculty subscriptions to academic journals that can cost $40,000 a year.

Best Buy's founder wants to return as savior

Aug 6, 2012
After resigning as chairman, Best Buy founder Richard Schulze wants to buy the retailer for $8 billion. What will it take to save Best Buy?

How bank-rate rigging hits the real world

Aug 6, 2012
The LIBOR rigging scandal extends beyond Wall Street. Local governments allege fake rates made budget shortfalls worse and hit public services.

How much for this gold-winning Olympian?

Aug 6, 2012
One sports agent talks about what can bring an athlete big bucks -- and what won't.

How metaphors shape our view of the economy

Aug 6, 2012
The economy is complex so we use metaphors to make it understandable. Sometimes, though, these metaphors also shape our view of the economy.

The lucrative crime of cardboard theft

Aug 6, 2012
For most people, cardboard is... just there. But stealing cardboard can be a relatively easy -- and surprisingly profitable -- crime.

Best Buy hasn’t fared well in the recession and now its founder is offering nearly $9 million to buy out the company. The Curiosity Rover has successfully landed on Mars — are humans the red planet’s next arrival? Harvard is considering canceling subscriptions to costly academic journals. In New York City, scavengers are stealing cardboard scraps and making millions. Kai Ryssdal talks to sports agent Evan Morgenstein about turning Olympic amateur athletes into sponsored, money-making machines. And we take a look at the metaphors we use to describe the economy.

Music from the episode

The Ghost Inside Broken Bells
The Ghost Inside Broken Bells
The Ghost Inside Broken Bells