Apr 19, 2010

Marketplace for Monday, April 19, 2010

HTML EMBED:
COPY

Marketplace for Monday, April 19, 2010

Segments From this episode

Doctors tackle health reform questions

Apr 19, 2010
Dr. Winston Capel talks with Kai Ryssdal about how much time he's spending on explaining health care reform, and whether it has been hard to get educated on how the health overhaul will work.

Some college kids addicted to tanning

Apr 19, 2010
A new study of college students says that about a third of those who used tanning beds might be addicted -- to tanning. Kerry Grens reports.

The business of doing more with less

Apr 19, 2010
Companies don't usually spend a lot of time trimming the little things when the economy's humming along. But when it's not, every last nickel counts. Finding those nickels is a business opportunity in itself. Andrea Gardner explains.

Alternative master's path stirs debate

Apr 19, 2010
The state of New York is set to decide on a plan that would allow alternative groups like Teach for America to create their own master's programs for teaching. Amy Scott reports.

A look behind the scenes helps with ads

Apr 19, 2010
CNN is trying product placement in one of its new shows. The camera on its "John King, USA" show will keep rolling right through the commercial breaks. Stacey Vanek-Smith reports.
The CNN logo in front of CNN Center
Rick Diamond/Getty Images for Allied Advertising

Where the financial reform bill stands

Apr 19, 2010
The financial overhaul bill is expected to hit the Senate floor this week. But there's wrangling over what form a consumer protection agency might take, and whether to set up an industry fund to wind down failed banks. Nancy Marshall Genzer reports.

Volcanic ash hurts U.S. exports, imports

Apr 19, 2010
The volcanic ash that's wreaking havoc in Europe is having an economic impact in the U.S. Companies are reporting inventory levels falling to dangerously low levels as supplies sit in European airports. Mitchell Hartman reports.

Dinner parties help fund arts projects

Apr 19, 2010
Public funding for the arts has been hurt by the downturn, so local groups have turned to small-scale private donors to offer micro-grants for starving artists. David Weinberg reports.