Dec 11, 2009

Marketplace for Friday, December 11, 2009

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Marketplace for Friday, December 11, 2009

Segments From this episode

Small biz may get help from TARP

Dec 11, 2009
President Obama will soon meet with top executives from the nation's largest banks. He's going to ask them why they aren't lending more, and he's going to sweeten the deal for banks that lend to small businesses. John Dimsdale reports.

Indian, Chinese growth helps U.S. firms

Dec 11, 2009
China's economy will probably grow more than 8% this year, and in the last quarter India's economy showed its fastest growth in 1.5 years. What's this mean for the U.S.? Alisa Roth reports.

Weekly Wrap: Economic roundup

Dec 11, 2009
Reuters blogger Felix Salmon and Clusterstock.com's John Carney talk with Kai Ryssdal about the TARP extension and President Obama's plans to create jobs.

Reinventing cities critical to climate

Dec 11, 2009
Most of the hard work building a low-carbon economy and lifestyle is going to be done in local communities. Commentator Alex Steffen says more than ever, acting globally means acting locally.

Business inventory increase a good sign

Dec 11, 2009
The Commerce Department says that after more than a year of cutting back, business owners started restocking their shelves in October. Amy Scott reports that bodes well for the economy.

Employee benefits start to come back

Dec 11, 2009
This time last year, companies laid off millions of people and a lot of workers saw their benefits dry up. Now some companies are resurrecting the benefits they scrapped a year ago. Stacey Vanek-Smith reports.
A FedEx employee delivers packages in New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty Imagesfe

NYC cyclists bike into buildings

Dec 11, 2009
Bike commuting is more popular than ever, and many cities are taking steps to accommodate two-wheelers. In New York City, a new law will allow people to bring bikes into office buildings. But some cyclists will be left out in the cold. Andrea Bernstein reports.

Antiques offer clue on economic health

Dec 11, 2009
The basic premise behind the TV show "Antiques Roadshow" is that there's no accounting for taste. Kai Ryssdal reports on how the collectibles market can say a lot about the economy.

Music from the episode