Apr 9, 2010

Marketplace for Friday, April 9, 2010

HTML EMBED:
COPY

Marketplace for Friday, April 9, 2010

Segments From this episode

Fannie execs blame failure on biz model

Apr 9, 2010
Former executives of the mortgage giant Fannie Mae testified before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission. The execs said Fannie and Freddie failed because they were victims of an unsustainable business model. Nancy Marshall Genzer reports.

MasterCard online mall uses card data

Apr 9, 2010
MasterCard will soon launch a big marketing campaign for its MarketPlace, an online mall, which it says will be specifically tailored to shoppers. Stacey Vanek-Smith reports.
MasterCard MarketPlace logo
marketplace.mastercard.com

A computer engineer Barbie campaign

Apr 9, 2010
Mattel's newest Barbie is a computer engineer because of a well-orchestrated campaign. Erin Fitzgerald, a Defense Department electrical engineer, talks with Bob Moon about why she helped rock the vote for the doll's career move.

Weekly Wrap: No crisis accountability

Apr 9, 2010
Freelance business journalist John Carney and The Big Money's Heidi Moore talk with Bob Moon about why so many bankers went before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission claiming ignorance, and China's move to reevaluate its currency.

Abuses in program that conceals flights

Apr 9, 2010
ProPublica's Michael Grabell talks with Bob Moon about an investigative report he co-wrote involving a program designed to conceal private jets' flight plans for security reasons, and how it's being misused.

Unemployed man gives savings away

Apr 9, 2010
Giving away $10 each day for a year might seem strange for someone who is unemployed. Rebecca Sheir reports on one Washington D.C. man's unique project, Year of Giving.

Small talk: China builds, trees, fake bills

Apr 9, 2010
Marketplace's Brendan Newnam and Rico Gagliano chat with fellow staffers Stacey Vanek-Smith, Brett Neely, and Jeremy Hobson about under-the-radar stories: A Chinese version of Times Square, miracle trees, and counterfeit $1 bills.

Investigative teams may hurt Toyota

Apr 9, 2010
Toyota says it's put together new investigative teams to look into reports of unintended acceleration as part of an effort to listen to customers more intently and address their concerns. Alisa Roth reports.

Music from the episode

Amazing Glow Pernice Brothers