Inflation, inflation, inflation
Nov 11, 2021

Inflation, inflation, inflation

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Inflation — it's everywhere in our economy. Today, we take a look at how it's impacting rents, tax brackets, even fertilizer.

Segments From this episode

What rising rents mean for inflation

Nov 11, 2021
Inflation on a larger scale is "transitory," we've been told by the Fed. But "rent growth is gonna remain strong," one experts says
In October, median net-effective rents for Manhattan apartments with no doorman increased by a 7.4% year over year, whereas apartments with doormen increased by 24.9%. Above, apartments on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.
Drew Angerer via Getty Images

Farmers face rising fertilizer prices and supply constraints

Nov 11, 2021
A big reason fertilizer is through the roof? Still-climbing natural gas prices.
Natural gas prices are at historic highs, and natural gas accounts for up to 90% of the operating cost of producing fertilizer.
JackF via Getty Images

Congress' budget gurus may slow down Biden’s Build Back Better plan

Nov 11, 2021
Zach Moller talks about what a Congressional Budget Office score is and how it affects legislation.
Democratic lawmakers are waiting for the Congressional Budget Office analysis of their proposal to expand the nation's social safety net.
Win McNamee via Getty Images

What California's new law means for garment workers and businesses

Nov 11, 2021
The law will guarantee an hourly wage for workers, but higher labor costs will put pressure on many small factories.
Garment worker Francisco Tzul has recently started working for a sewing contractor that pays an hourly wage rather than a piece rate.
Caroline Champlin/Marketplace

IRS updates tax brackets in response to inflation

Nov 11, 2021
The IRS adjusted more than 60 tax provisions, including rate schedules, to take rising prices into account.
Following the news of decades-high inflation in the U.S. economy, the IRS released new rates for the standard deduction and tax brackets.
Chip Somodevilla via Getty Images

Why did the outdoor economy suffer in 2020 when more of us were outside?

Nov 11, 2021
Lockdowns, public lands closures, supply chain disruptions and travel restrictions took a toll. But many outdoor retailers still had a great year.
More Americans got out and about biking, fishing and hiking amid COVID-19 in 2020. Above, a bike shop owner repairs a tire in Brooklyn.
Michael M. Santiago via Getty Images

Music from the episode

Adventure Monster Rally
Easy To Get Hot Chip
Mystik Tash Sultana
Eple Röyksopp

The team

Nancy Farghalli Executive Producer
Daisy Palacios Senior Producer
Sean McHenry Associate Producer
Andie Corban Associate Producer
Richard Cunningham Associate Producer