Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
This Is Uncomfortable
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Where to Listen:
ABOUT SHOW
Your social media posts are likely way more predictable than you think

Your social media posts are likely way more predictable than you think

Jan 28, 2019

Social media was invented to keep up with friends, but if you're fed up with data leaks and privacy concerns, you might decide to quit. It turns out social media may not even need you to know you, because your…

Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
 

Stories From this episode

Marketplace Tech Blogs

Your social media posts are likely way more predictable than you think

by Molly Wood Jan 28, 2019
A new study shows your friends' posts can indicate what you're likely to say on social media.
"If I choose to use one of these platforms and I'm giving it useful information about myself, then our research suggests that, in principle, I'm also giving it useful information about my friends," said Jim Bagrow, a professor at the University of Vermont who led a study about Twitter privacy.
Leon Neal/Getty Images

More From This Episode

Social media was invented to keep up with friends, but if you’re fed up with data leaks and privacy concerns, you might decide to quit. It turns out social media may not even need you to know you, because your friends and their posts are pretty good indicators of who you are. In a new study, scientists took to Twitter and found people who interacted regularly. By analyzing the tweets of just eight or nine of a user’s friends, they could predict the kinds of things the original user would post. Marketplace’s Jed Kim talks with Jim Bagrow, a professor at the University of Vermont who led the study.

Today’s show is sponsored by the University of Florida Warrington College of Business and Triple Byte.

The team

Molly Wood Host
Eve Troeh Senior Producer
Stephanie Hughes Producer