The world might be mad at Facebook, but advertisers still love it
Jan 15, 2019

The world might be mad at Facebook, but advertisers still love it

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You, or people you know, might have quit Facebook over the last year or so. But you know who hasn't left? Advertisers. Facebook is still the second-biggest digital ad platform in the world, just behind Google. And in 2018, a lot of us realized just how Facebook uses our posts, our connections, photos, location, the quizzes we take, to help advertisers target us. But there have been changes. The past year brought the Cambridge Analytica scandal, new privacy rules in Europe and days of getting yelled at by Congress. Now Facebook says it's trying to clean up and streamline what it calls the "data supply chain": where the data comes from, who gets access to it and how it gets used. Molly Wood talks about it with Mark Rabkin, vice president of ads and business platform at Facebook.

Today's show is sponsored by Indeed.

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The world might be mad at Facebook, but advertisers still love it

Jan 15, 2019
The social media platform says it's trying to clean up its "data supply chain."
When it comes to user privacy, Facebook is trying to clean up its “data supply chain”: where the data comes from, who gets access to it and how it gets used.
Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images

You, or people you know, might have quit Facebook over the last year or so. But you know who hasn’t left? Advertisers. Facebook is still the second-biggest digital ad platform in the world, just behind Google. And in 2018, a lot of us realized just how Facebook uses our posts, our connections, photos, location, the quizzes we take, to help advertisers target us. But there have been changes. The past year brought the Cambridge Analytica scandal, new privacy rules in Europe and days of getting yelled at by Congress. Now Facebook says it’s trying to clean up and streamline what it calls the “data supply chain”: where the data comes from, who gets access to it and how it gets used. Molly Wood talks about it with Mark Rabkin, vice president of ads and business platform at Facebook.

Today’s show is sponsored by Indeed.

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