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Marketplace Tech for Thursday, February 6, 2014
Feb 6, 2014

Marketplace Tech for Thursday, February 6, 2014

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The winter olympics start Tomorrow in the Russian city of Sochi. Olympians, officials, and reporters have been arriving all week with lots of devices in tow. And that means there's been a lot of talk about digital surveillance. Russia's government doesn't have the best record in, say, protecting freedom of the press. Plus, YouTube used to be a place that was mostly about curiosities, bits of original, unedited video clips by amateurs. Then people started getting serious. The amateurs started getting famous because of what -- and how much -- video they were putting on the website. YouTube started selling ads on all those videos and giving some of that money to creators. But as one New York Times reporter found out, it can still be hard to make the big bucks even when you're a super YouTuber.

Segments From this episode

Avoiding government surveillance at the Olympic games

Feb 6, 2014
Olympic visitors will have to deal with protecting their data in a country with a less-than-ideal reputation for cyber security.

Twitter's good earnings report just doesn't cut it for investors

Feb 6, 2014
Despite a favorable report, investors are unhappy about Twitter's number of users.

The winter olympics start Tomorrow in the Russian city of Sochi. Olympians, officials, and reporters have been arriving all week with lots of devices in tow. And that means there’s been a lot of talk about digital surveillance. Russia’s government doesn’t have the best record in, say, protecting freedom of the press. Plus, YouTube used to be a place that was mostly about curiosities, bits of original, unedited video clips by amateurs. Then people started getting serious. The amateurs started getting famous because of what — and how much — video they were putting on the website. YouTube started selling ads on all those videos and giving some of that money to creators. But as one New York Times reporter found out, it can still be hard to make the big bucks even when you’re a super YouTuber.

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