Sep 25, 2020

Wall Street’s guesses about the election and markets

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President Trump's recent unwillingness to comment on a peaceful transfer of power has constitutional experts and stock market strategists worried. Uncertainty tends to mean market volatility. Plus, how local businesses that depend on the economy of college sports are faring.

Segments From this episode

Banks weigh in on what the 2020 presidential election might do to the stock market

Sep 25, 2020
Economists often look to previous elections to model upcoming ones, but 2020 continues to break the mold.
Goldman Sachs economists said in a note Thursday that worries are overblown — that there will be a victor on election night and in turn the markets will stay steady.
Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Regardless of what happens on Election Day, expect market volatility

That's what Christopher Low, chief economist at FHN Financial, has to say. "Although," he added, "by the time we get into next year, it doesn't seem to matter who's elected. Once the presidential election is behind us, the stock market always tends to do well in the first year."

How COVID-19 disrupts the economics of college football in small-town Texas

Sep 25, 2020
People who go to sporting events at Texas A&M University usually spend more than $120 million a year.
Because of COVID, Texas A&M is allowing only 25% of the stadium to be filled for its upcoming home games, but that’s still about 30,000 people.
Scott Halleran/Getty Images

Music from the episode

Wake Up, Get Up, Get Out There Lollia, Sleeping Forest

The team

Nicole Childers Executive Producer
Victoria Craig Producer, BBC
Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC
Jonathan Frewin Producer, BBC
Daniel Shin Producer
Candace Manriquez Wrenn Producer/Editor
Brian Allison Engineer
Alex Schroeder Digital producer
Meredith Garretson Producer
Erika Soderstrom Producer/Director