Sep 25, 2012

Marketplace Morning Report for Tuesday, September 25, 2012

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Years after the financial crisis here in the U.S., there are many strong voices that say the government, and regulators, didn't do enough. One such voice is Sheila Bair, the former chairwoman of the FDIC. In her new book, she writes about her push to tighten lending standards on mortgages, her clashes with then New York Fed head Timothy Geithner, and why she is disappointed in both Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Plus, today San Francisco's Board of Supervisors will consider changing  the city's building code to
allow for tiny apartments, and developers love the idea.

Segments From this episode

Health care spending grows 4% after downward trend

Sep 24, 2012
Study finds growth in healthcare spending has reversed its post-recession slump.

New CEO plans to motivate Yahoo! employees

Sep 24, 2012
Free phones and free lunch are nice perks, but what about innovations that get the company growing again?

Former regulator Sheila Bair on the financial crisis

Sep 25, 2012
It may be too early to assign blame for Europe's economic crisis, but it is not too early to figure out what went wrong in this country back in 2008. Sheila Bair headed the FDIC back then, and is out with a new book this morning, in which she says she saw signs of trouble in subprime mortgages way back in 2006.

San Francisco considers allowing micro-apartments

Sep 25, 2012
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors will vote today on whether to allow the building of micro-apartments as small as 150 square feet. Similar programs have started to be tested in New York and Boston.

Growing China-Japan tensions could help U.S. economy

Sep 25, 2012
The ongoing fight between China and Japan over a chain of islands continues, and now it has Toyota is scaling back production of its luxury Lexus models because of reduced demand in China.

Loudoun County resident on the 2012 elections

Sep 25, 2012
President Obama and Mitt Romney will be in New York this morning for speeches at the Clinton Global Initiative. Josh Dinman, meanwhile, will be at work in Loudoun County, trying to figure out which one of them he should vote for.

A growing controversy over 'chateau' wine label

Sep 25, 2012
European wine experts are mulling over a critical issue today: whether American wine producers should be allowed to use the word "chateau" on bottles they sell in Europe.

The good news in housing and confidence

Sep 25, 2012
Today, the latest Case-Shiller Home Price index was released. It looks at housing prices in the 20 biggest metropolitan areas of the country. Consumers are also upbeat: consumer confidence jumped to the highest level since February.

Looking for potential in future employees

Sep 25, 2012
If you're looking for a job or trying to get ahead in this economy, there's some age-old wisdom that would seem to apply: play up your accomplishments. Seems obvious, but maybe that's in fact not your best plan of attack.

PODCAST: Consumer confidence, health care spending jump up

Sep 25, 2012
Health care spending grew more than 4 percent last year. Workers at Yahoo! are expecting to hear from the company's new CEO today on her plans to jump-start growth. A dispute between China and Japan over a chain of islands could have a real impact on the U.S. economy because Japan is expected to switch focus from a free-trade pact with China to a new one with the United States. And if you're trying to get ahead in this economy, there's some age-old wisdom that would seem to apply -- play up your accomplishments. Seems obvious, but maybe that's in fact not your best plan of attack.

Years after the financial crisis here in the U.S., there are many strong voices that say the government, and regulators, didn’t do enough. One such voice is Sheila Bair, the former chairwoman of the FDIC. In her new book, she writes about her push to tighten lending standards on mortgages, her clashes with then New York Fed head Timothy Geithner, and why she is disappointed in both Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Plus, today San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors will consider changing  the city’s building code to
allow for tiny apartments, and developers love the idea.

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC