Marketplace Morning Report for Tuesday, March 24, 2015
Mar 24, 2015

Marketplace Morning Report for Tuesday, March 24, 2015

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Airing on Tuesday, March 24, 2015: After the 2008 financial collapse, the government required banks to prove if they failed some day it wouldn't drag down the rest of the financial system and require a bailout. The documents to prove this are known informally as "living wills." Last summer it emerged that a range of U.S.-based bank still posed too much systemic risk if they were to go bankrupt. Today, several published reports say three foreign owned banks also lack persuasive living wills. BNP Paribas, HSBC, and Royal Bank of Scotland. More on that. And there's news today about factories in China, where an index of manufacturing fell in March. We take a look at the issue. Plus, Shell is expected to get the green light this week to re-start drilling for oil in the Arctic. Critics fear low oil prices may raise pressure on the company to cut corners and compromise safety. Given its poor safety record in the Arctic, why is the US supporting Shell’s application? We explore.

Segments From this episode

Big tobacco says your e-cigarette may kill you

Mar 24, 2015
What’s driving this public health message?

Health-conscious consumers reach for spices

Mar 24, 2015
Americans' growing preference for home-cooked meals helps the spice industry.

Shell's Arctic drilling questioned over safety concerns

Mar 24, 2015
Shell is expected to get a green light to re-start Arctic oil and gas drilling

PODCAST: Spicing things up

Mar 24, 2015
The effects of oil on industry, warnings about e-cigarettes, and spices become a hot item.

The 'Angelina Jolie effect' on medical testing

Mar 24, 2015
In a New York Times op-ed, Angelina Jolie writes of a tough medical decision.
Director Angelina Jolie attends the UK Premiere of 'Unbroken' at Odeon Leicester Square on November 25, 2014 in London, England. 
Anthony Harvey/Getty Images

Airing on Tuesday, March 24, 2015: After the 2008 financial collapse, the government required banks to prove if they failed some day it wouldn’t drag down the rest of the financial system and require a bailout. The documents to prove this are known informally as “living wills.” Last summer it emerged that a range of U.S.-based bank still posed too much systemic risk if they were to go bankrupt. Today, several published reports say three foreign owned banks also lack persuasive living wills. BNP Paribas, HSBC, and Royal Bank of Scotland. More on that. And there’s news today about factories in China, where an index of manufacturing fell in March. We take a look at the issue. Plus, Shell is expected to get the green light this week to re-start drilling for oil in the Arctic. Critics fear low oil prices may raise pressure on the company to cut corners and compromise safety. Given its poor safety record in the Arctic, why is the US supporting Shell’s application? We explore.

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC