Marketplace Morning Report for Thursday, March 26, 2015
Mar 26, 2015

Marketplace Morning Report for Thursday, March 26, 2015

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Airing on Thursday, March 26, 2015: With the Saudi-led coalition bombing targets in Yemen to stop advances by Houthi rebels, the price of oil right now is up 4 percent. That's a dramatic spike, given that Yemen accounts for a tiny percentage of the world's oil. More on that. Plus, did you know that nearsightedness causes people to make bad decisions about money? I'm talking about a kind of myopia that can't be fixed by the optometrist. It's the human tendency to see the future as hazy and the present sharply in focus. Behavioral economists have a fancy name for it: "hyperbolic discounting". Joseph Kable, a neuroscientist in the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, joins us to talk about it.

 

Segments From this episode

David Brancaccio wants you to consult your future self

Mar 25, 2015
In personal finance, it's easy to focus too much on the present.

The health insurance industry looks...well, healthy

Mar 26, 2015
A new report finds that the health insurance business model has adapted to the ACA.

Microsoft wants contractors to take some time off

Mar 26, 2015
The tech giant says all its contractors must offer employees at least 15 days off.

Balancing collaboration and skepticism in regulation

Mar 26, 2015
Why one Wall Street lawyer thinks "regulatory capture" is a myth.

PODCAST: The relationship of regulating

Mar 26, 2015
Airstrikes in Yemen, "regulatory capture," and money lessons from playing in a rock band.

Airing on Thursday, March 26, 2015: With the Saudi-led coalition bombing targets in Yemen to stop advances by Houthi rebels, the price of oil right now is up 4 percent. That’s a dramatic spike, given that Yemen accounts for a tiny percentage of the world’s oil. More on that. Plus, did you know that nearsightedness causes people to make bad decisions about money? I’m talking about a kind of myopia that can’t be fixed by the optometrist. It’s the human tendency to see the future as hazy and the present sharply in focus. Behavioral economists have a fancy name for it: “hyperbolic discounting”. Joseph Kable, a neuroscientist in the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, joins us to talk about it.

 

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC