Marketplace Morning Report for Friday, July 17, 2015
Jul 17, 2015

Marketplace Morning Report for Friday, July 17, 2015

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Airing on Friday, July 17, 2015: The Senate passed an overhaul of the No Child Left Behind act Thursday. Annual testing will still be required in most grades, but the federal government will have less of a role in how those tests are used to hold schools accountable. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan joins us to talk about it. Plus, General Electric has asked the U.S. government for permission to do business in Iran. We look at the company's strategy for operating there ahead of GE's earnings report out Friday. Puerto Rico missed a second bond payment as its finances worsened. Can it file for bankruptcy? If so, would that be a solution to its debt problem?

Segments From this episode

Just sponsor it

Jul 17, 2015
Nike will pay the University of Michigan $169 million to be its athletic brand.

Senate votes to revise No Child Left Behind

Jul 17, 2015
Negotiators must now reconcile the bill with the version passed in the House.

Iran wants new U.S. planes

Jul 17, 2015
Do American companies want to enter the Iranian airplane market?

The problem with Puerto Rico's debt

Jul 17, 2015
Because of its exclusion from Chapter 9 provisions, handling debt is complicated.

PODCAST: The battle for branding

Jul 17, 2015
The vote on No Child Left Behind, and the battle for college sponsorship.

Airing on Friday, July 17, 2015: The Senate passed an overhaul of the No Child Left Behind act Thursday. Annual testing will still be required in most grades, but the federal government will have less of a role in how those tests are used to hold schools accountable. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan joins us to talk about it. Plus, General Electric has asked the U.S. government for permission to do business in Iran. We look at the company’s strategy for operating there ahead of GE’s earnings report out Friday. Puerto Rico missed a second bond payment as its finances worsened. Can it file for bankruptcy? If so, would that be a solution to its debt problem?

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC