Hurricane Lane and the cost of natural disasters
Aug 24, 2018

Hurricane Lane and the cost of natural disasters

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Hurricane Lane is currently a Category 3 storm with 120 miles an hour winds. The slow pace of the storm means it's dumping a lot of rain according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center. There's extreme flooding on the Big Island of Hawaii and it expects up to 40 inches of rain in some places causing life-threatening flash flooding and landslides into the weekend. The last major hurricane to hit Hawaii was Hurricane Iniki in 1992. We talk to Karl Kim, professor of at the University of Hawaii and executive director of the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center, about what it's going to take to recover. Also, tomorrow will be one year since Hurricane Harvey dumped trillions of gallons of water on southeast Texas. Tomorrow is also the day voters in Harris County, the greater Houston area, will head to the polls to vote on a $2.5 billion bond package for flood risk reduction projects across the county. We check in with the residents of Houston. 

Today's show is sponsored by Indeed  (Indeed.com/marketplace) and Carbonite (www.carbonite.com). (08/24/2018)


Hurricane Lane is currently a Category 3 storm with 120 miles an hour winds. The slow pace of the storm means it’s dumping a lot of rain according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center. There’s extreme flooding on the Big Island of Hawaii and it expects up to 40 inches of rain in some places causing life-threatening flash flooding and landslides into the weekend. The last major hurricane to hit Hawaii was Hurricane Iniki in 1992. We talk to Karl Kim, professor of at the University of Hawaii and executive director of the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center, about what it’s going to take to recover. Also, tomorrow will be one year since Hurricane Harvey dumped trillions of gallons of water on southeast Texas. Tomorrow is also the day voters in Harris County, the greater Houston area, will head to the polls to vote on a $2.5 billion bond package for flood risk reduction projects across the county. We check in with the residents of Houston. 

Today’s show is sponsored by Indeed  (Indeed.com/marketplace) and Carbonite (www.carbonite.com). (08/24/2018)

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC