May 16, 2017

05/16/2017: The high price of the future

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Ford could lay off about 10 percent of its workforce worldwide, most of whom may be salaried workers. On today's show, we'll discuss one of the issues the company is grappling with: its investment in the future, a move that comes at the expense of high costs in the present. Afterwards, we'll look at a new Trump administration policy that will deny funding to foreign nongovernmental organizations that promote abortion, and then explore how ESPN will try to use its out-of-home audience numbers to court advertisers. 

Segments From this episode

5 percent of patients drive 50 percent of health care spending. A new bill aims to change that.

May 16, 2017
Republicans and Democrats don’t quite see eye to eye when it comes to repealing Obamacare. But when the Senate Finance Committee meets today, there’s likely to be common ground on how to improve care for the 3.5 million sickest and most expensive Medicare patients: a new bipartisan bill that targets new treatments for the people […]

Counting television viewers outside their homes

May 16, 2017
For live-event outlets like ESPN and news channels, this data is critical.
Fans gather to watch a soccer game at a New York City pub.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

You could be paying more sales tax online if states get their way

May 16, 2017
Amazon has agreed to collect sales tax on all its transactions. Now states are targeting all other online retailers.
A parcel is prepared for dispatch at an Amazon warehouse. 
Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

It’s back to basics for Target stores

May 16, 2017
Target reports its earnings Wednesday. After months of slumping sales and profits, the retailer is getting back to retailing basics: Renovating stores and pricing grocery items more competitively. That strategy means the Minneapolis-based retailer is abandoning some of the more futuristic innovations it was experimenting with. Click the audio player above to hear the full story. […]

05/16/2017: Why many millennials actually aren't buying homes

May 16, 2017
News is that construction on new houses and apartment complexes took a dip in April. Why aren't young people buying homes like they used to? Hint: It's not because of avocado toast purchases. We'll look at the structural changes that are happening within our economy. Afterwards, we'll explore how Target is trying to pull itself out of a slump, which includes abandoning some of its futuristic innovations, and talk about a new bipartisan bill in Congress that aims to help people who cycle in and out of the hospital.

Ford could lay off about 10 percent of its workforce worldwide, most of whom may be salaried workers. On today’s show, we’ll discuss one of the issues the company is grappling with: its investment in the future, a move that comes at the expense of high costs in the present. Afterwards, we’ll look at a new Trump administration policy that will deny funding to foreign nongovernmental organizations that promote abortion, and then explore how ESPN will try to use its out-of-home audience numbers to court advertisers. 

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC