Sep 14, 2012

Marketplace Money for Friday, September 14, 2012

HTML EMBED:
COPY

A year ago, Occupy Wall Street began in New York's Zuccotti Park and spread to cities all across the U.S. You couldn't miss hearing about the 99 percent versus the 1 percent on Twitter, Facebook, TV, and the radio. But…

Segments From this episode

Longer loans allow consumers to stretch their budgets

Sep 14, 2012
Six and seven-year car loans are increasingly popular, though they come at a higher price over the long term.

Dear Big Banks, from Occupy Wall Street

Sep 14, 2012
Letters written during the Occupy Wall Street movement provide insight into what sparked the protests one year ago.
A man holds a sign as Occupy Wall Street protesters march near Wall Street on the one-year anniversary of the movement in New York.
Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Lasting legacy of Occupy Wall Street remains unclear

Sep 14, 2012
Social movements come and go -- will Occupy Wall Street be one that lasts? Or has it already dissipated? Also, listen to letters that Occupiers wrote to financial institutions.
An Occupy Wall Street banner is seen in Union Square at the end of a march from Zuccotti Park to Union Square on in New York City.
Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Getting advertised sale price easier said than done

Sep 14, 2012
David Segal, a.k.a. The Haggler at the New York Times has a cautionary tale for those looking for great deals.
A woman looks into the window of a store advertising summer sales. Although the sales prices are printed on paper, it may be difficult to actually buy an item on sale.
Adam Berry/Getty Images

Paying for beauty in a drought

Sep 14, 2012
It's not easy to maintain a beautiful lawn...especially when there's no water.
A groundskeeper waters flowers.
Andrew Redington/Getty Images

An age-old pre-occupation: The fountain of youth

Sep 14, 2012
There's a price to be paid for aging gracefully

To a football fan with financial savvy

Sep 14, 2012
One football fan in Ann Arbor, Michigan finds a way to pay for his renovation with upscale tailgating.
Michigan Wolverines fans look on during the game.
Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

The expense of the synagogue in Jewish faith

Sep 14, 2012
Part of our series on life at the intersection of religion and personal finance
Jews congregate in a synagogue.
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

A year ago, Occupy Wall Street began in New York’s Zuccotti Park and spread to cities all across the U.S. You couldn’t miss hearing about the 99 percent versus the 1 percent on Twitter, Facebook, TV, and the radio. But on the movement’s one-year anniversary we ask the question: Did protesters succeed? In fact, banks are still giving money to people who can’t afford to pay it back. We’re not talking home mortgages here; this time it’s car loans. Plus, we talk with two newlyweds and their Rabbi about personal finance. It’s the latest in our series on religion and money.

Raise a glass to Marketplace!

Just $7/month gets you a limited edition KaiPA pint glass. Plus bragging rights that you support independent journalism.
Donate today to get yours!