Reema Khrais

Host and reporter

SHORT BIO

I'm the host of “This Is Uncomfortable,” a podcast about how money influences our lives and relationships. I spend most of my days interviewing people with surprising, intimate stories around money and jobs.

What was your first job?

Pizzeria hostess — for months, my diet consisted of BBQ chicken and garlic bread.

In your next life, what would your career be?

Game show presenter.

What’s your most memorable Marketplace moment?

One day, I was recording a story in the studio when LeVar Burton casually walks in, realizes he's interrupted something, apologizes profusely and leaves before I could say anything.

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

A heating pad because we work in a large freezer.

Latest Stories (195)

Did department stores train people to be difficult customers?

Aug 13, 2021
Amanda Mull, a staff writer at The Atlantic, argues that department stores had a hand in building class consciousness.
Customers shop at Macys department store in New York on Black Friday, Nov. 27, 2020.
Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

COVID closed Philadelphia's Poi Dog, but the sauces and recipes remain

Aug 12, 2021
Kiki Aranita closed her restaurant after the city shut down. A year later, she's still making Hawaiian food and building the brand.
Poi Dog, Kiki Aranita's former Hawaiian restaurant. She continues her career in food and  her efforts to build the Poi Dog brand.
Photo courtesy Kiki Aranita

The dates on food labels may not mean what you think they mean

Aug 11, 2021
Vox writer Alissa Wilkinson explains the history behind food label dates, and how the "expiration date" concept is a costly misunderstanding.
A produce worker stocks shelves at a supermarket in Washington, D.C.
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

How the pandemic affected one paramedic's career

Jul 19, 2021
With the pandemic forcing school and daycare closures around the country, children are spending more time at home — and women are bearing the brunt of that.
Women’s labor force participation fell to 56.2% in June, the lowest levels since 1988, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

How one small business owner kept all his employees with revenue down 70%

Jan 18, 2021
Drew Dalzell, president of Diablo Sound in Los Angeles, took on half a million dollars in debt to keep his business afloat and staff working.
Angela Weiss/Getty Images

How Black Americans have been blocked from voting throughout U.S. history

A conversation with Gilda R. Daniels, author of “Uncounted: The Crisis of Voter Suppression in America.”
Various labor unions and progressive organizations protest on Capitol Hill Sept. 16, 2015, calling for the restoration of the Voting Rights Act struck down by the Supreme Court.
PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP via Getty Images

Crying at work is uncomfortable, and that's OK

Jun 25, 2019
One of the country's foremost crying-at-work experts set us straight on shedding tears at the office.
It's ok, let it out.
AMC/screengrab via Netflix

Dollar stores might not be selling items for a dollar for much longer

About 70 percent of these products come from China, and with an ongoing trade war between the U.S. and China, this could mean higher prices will be passed down to consumers before long.
Ken Garduno

Then and now: Syrian refugees reflect on their lives

Sep 5, 2018
They found new homes in Turkey, along with frustration, resignation and hope.
Reema Khrais/Marketplace

Young Syrians rethink their future as refugees in Turkey

Aug 31, 2018
Before the Syrian war in 2011, nearly 25 percent of young people went to college, which is almost completely subsidized by the government.
Othman Nahhas spends a good chunk of his paycheck paying for half of his family's rent in Istanbul.
Courtesy of Musab Yousef