Help us end the fiscal year strong. Donate by midnight tonight. Donate Now

Mitchell Hartman

Senior Reporter

SHORT BIO

I am a staff reporter for Marketplace covering the economy, economic indicators, employment, labor and workforce.

What was your first job?

I had a job every summer during college running the receiving dock in a large sheet metal factory in North Jersey that made cans. My first job in journalism was as an editorial clerk at the Philadelphia Inquirer after graduating college in 1985.

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

Marketplace has among the tightest deadlines and the most demanding expectations for daily news stories of any national public radio newsroom IMHO.

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

If you love your job, stick with it. If you're really good at something, keep doing it.

In your next life, what would your career be?

Bodhisattva (in the Mahayana Buddhist tradition, a being on the brink of enlightenment who could end the cycle of rebirth and gain nirvana but chooses to return out of compassion for other beings). Seriously, if I came back in a next life, it would confirm this teaching and I would care more about being in harmony with the universe than having another career. If I had to choose a career (and just be a bodhisattva on the side, I guess), I'd be a public radio reporter again.

Fill in the blank: Money can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you ______.

Tickets.

What is something that everyone should own, no matter how much it costs?

Health insurance.

What’s something that you thought you knew but later found out you were wrong about?

Being a parent would constrain my choices and box me in. It did, but I didn't care.

What’s your most memorable Marketplace moment?

Emceeing a Sotheby's auction of literary memorabilia from the Beat Generation — I sold Jack Kerouac's last shot glass for high six figures. (As David Brancaccio was oft-required to say on air after segments like this: “It was a joke!”)

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

Eve Epstein, my former editor and now office mate in the Marketplace Portland bureau at All Classical Portland.

Latest Stories (1,793)

Consumers are pulling back on spending. They're also tapping savings and taking on debt.

Jun 30, 2022
That's good news for inflation, but it might be bad news when it comes to the risk of a recession.
The price of everything — from groceries and gasoline to discretionary purchases like travel — is going up. As a result, consumers aren't spending as freely.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Modern parking "meters" give cities the power to reduce congestion

Jun 28, 2022
Parking charges based on timing or vehicle type, for example, can encourage drivers to consider other forms of transit.
A frustrating public parking experience may make drivers reconsider driving in the first place.
Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

Central bankers' group sees a "narrow path" to rein in inflation and maintain growth

Jun 27, 2022
It's largely about preventing “inflationary psychology” from becoming entrenched, the Bank for International Settlements said.
The Bank for International Settlements warned that “inflationary psychology” could become entrenched and self-reinforcing. But the effort to douse inflation comes with risk of its own.
Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

Fed inflation fight could hinder wage gains for lowest-paid workers

Jun 27, 2022
It's all about reducing the demand for labor.
The Federal Reserve's efforts to deal with inflation could have ripple effects that reach workers in lower-wage jobs.
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Lowest-paid workers will likely feel the pinch of cooling economy first

Jun 23, 2022
Those same workers have seen their wages grow faster than the overall average in the last year thanks to the labor shortage.
Workers in low-paid environments, like restaurants and bars, saw some of the biggest wage gains during the pandemic.
Scott Heins/Getty Images

The Federal Reserve thinks the job market is too hot. Interest rate hikes may be cooling it down.

Jun 17, 2022
Employment remains strong so far, but the battle against inflation could lead to job losses.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Inflation's a global problem. Curbing it may send some countries' economies into recession.

Jun 16, 2022
The U.S. economy might have an easier time achieving a "soft landing" than economies in Europe and elsewhere.
Europe has not yet reached pre-pandemic employment or output levels, and the ECB has signaled an interest rate hike next month. Above, the European Central Bank headquarters in Frankfurt, Germany.
Daniel Roland/AFP via Getty Images

Consumers are spending up a storm — and spending down their savings

May 27, 2022
Even though they're pessimistic about the economy and economists worry about a recession.
Americans are spending more money than they've got coming in each month.
Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Payments for new mortgages are soaring. That's why home sales are slowing.

May 27, 2022
The median monthly payment on a new mortgage is up more than 40% over last year.
Tim Boyle/Getty Images

Rising interest rates and soaring home prices put mortgage payments out of reach for many

May 26, 2022
The median payment on a new mortgage increased almost 9% from March to April.
Pending home sales declined by 3.9% in April, the sixth consecutive monthly drop.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

The clock is ticking 

We’re so close! Our fiscal year ends at midnight tonight. Help us reach our fundraising goal by making your gift of any amount now!