Mitchell Hartman

Senior Reporter

SHORT BIO

I am a staff reporter for Marketplace covering the economy, economic indicators, employment, labor and workforce.

What was your first job?

I had a job every summer during college running the receiving dock in a large sheet metal factory in North Jersey that made cans. My first job in journalism was as an editorial clerk at the Philadelphia Inquirer after graduating college in 1985.

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

Marketplace has among the tightest deadlines and the most demanding expectations for daily news stories of any national public radio newsroom IMHO.

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

If you love your job, stick with it. If you're really good at something, keep doing it.

In your next life, what would your career be?

Bodhisattva (in the Mahayana Buddhist tradition, a being on the brink of enlightenment who could end the cycle of rebirth and gain nirvana but chooses to return out of compassion for other beings). Seriously, if I came back in a next life, it would confirm this teaching and I would care more about being in harmony with the universe than having another career. If I had to choose a career (and just be a bodhisattva on the side, I guess), I'd be a public radio reporter again.

Fill in the blank: Money can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you ______.

Tickets.

What is something that everyone should own, no matter how much it costs?

Health insurance.

What’s something that you thought you knew but later found out you were wrong about?

Being a parent would constrain my choices and box me in. It did, but I didn't care.

What’s your most memorable Marketplace moment?

Emceeing a Sotheby's auction of literary memorabilia from the Beat Generation — I sold Jack Kerouac's last shot glass for high six figures. (As David Brancaccio was oft-required to say on air after segments like this: “It was a joke!”)

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

Eve Epstein, my former editor and now office mate in the Marketplace Portland bureau at All Classical Portland.

Latest Stories (1,518)

Nearly a third of tenants either missed or couldn't pay full July rent, survey finds

Jul 10, 2020
The problem is worse among households earning $50,000 a year or less.
One reason tenants have been able to pay at all is the $600-a-week federal pandemic unemployment payments.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Expanded COVID-19 unemployment money is helping millions of workers pay their bills

Jul 9, 2020
The extra $600 every week is set to run out at the end of this month.
Juanmonino via Getty Images

About a third of companies cut employee pay in response to COVID-19, survey finds

Jul 8, 2020
More than half of the companies making cuts say they helped avoid layoffs, for now.
Of the companies that cut employee pay in response to the pandemic, over half of them say cuts allowed them to avoid layoffs.
Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

It's the last month of $600-a-week unemployment benefits. What happens next?

Jul 7, 2020
Unless Congress extends the $600-a-week program, benefits are set to expire at the end of July.
Overall, jobless benefits are pumping about $100 billion per month into the U.S. economy.
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Expect more staycations this summer

Jul 3, 2020
AAA predicts trips on planes, cruises, buses and trains will be down 75% to 85%.
Beachgoers take in the views while wearing masks in Ventura, California. Planning a summer vacation this year poses extra logistical challenges.
Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Despite June's bullish employment numbers, the job market is reeling — and will be for a while

Jul 2, 2020
Employment remains below pre-pandemic levels, and as recently reopened businesses re-close, more job losses are on the way.
A grocery store employee cleans carts for customers in New York. Low-wage workers are disproportionately affected by the suffering job market.
Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

When $600-a-week pandemic unemployment checks run out, what then?

Jun 30, 2020
If Congress doesn't act, Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation is set to expire on July 31.
A Florida resident receives an unemployment insurance application in April. Many recipients could be shocked if the temporary extra benefit terminates at the end of July.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How are mask-wearing policies changing as U.S. COVID-19 cases spike?

Jun 30, 2020
Businesses of all kinds are facing pretty much the same mess of overlapping federal, state and local guidelines.
Most airlines, for example, require masks in-flight, but only a few threaten to ban noncompliant passengers.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

As infections surge, reopenings stumble

Jun 29, 2020
Epidemiologists warn that COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations have spiked in the states that reopened most aggressively.
A man gets his hair cut at a barbershop in Austin, Texas, in May. Texas is one of several states with spiking coronavirus cases after an early reopening.
Sergio Flores/AFP via Getty Images