Kimberly Adams

Correspondent

SHORT BIO

I cover the intersection between politics and the economy, with a special focus on how federal policy affects the bottom line for businesses and individuals.

What was your first job?

Dental assistant. (Flossing is crucial.)

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

The "biggest" stories are not necessarily the most important stories to tell.

In your next life, what would your career be?

Astronaut ... definitely an astronaut.

What’s something that you thought you knew but later found out you were wrong about?

How to pronounce "subsequently."

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

My mug, which says "I'm a Grown-A** Lady and I Do What I Want."

 

Latest Stories (716)

Is traveling to Instagram-famous vacation spots ever worth the money?

Oct 18, 2022
"You'll have so much more fun going somewhere else that is more catered to you," says Rebecca Jennings of Vox.
Don't limit your travel research to Instagram.
Filippo Monteforte/AFP via Getty Images

When it comes to health apps, don't count on HIPAA to protect your medical info

Sep 26, 2022
Web searches about medical issues and data in health trackers aren't guaranteed the confidentiality given to records in a doctor's office.
HIPAA protects the information about you that resides with your doctors and insurers. It doesn't apply to your web browsing or app use, though.
Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images)

Frustrating user-experience tactics can have real harm, "dark pattern" expert says

Aug 10, 2022
Website and app design strategies that trick users can cost consumers time and money, Harry Brignull says.
From hidden fees when booking a rental property, to a subscription that seems impossible to cancel, dark patterns are annoyances that can cost you time and money.
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

As wildfire disasters multiply, evacuation planning lags

Aug 8, 2022
Fires are unpredictable. They can spark anywhere, grow to any size and move in any direction, says Caroline Mimbs Nyce of The Atlantic.
Evacuated residents watch a fire burn a hillside in California. Wildfires are a relatively new form of disaster, says Caroline Mimbs Nyce, a staff writer at The Atlantic. "There's no playbook."
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Workers are picking up extra jobs just to pay for daily necessities

Aug 8, 2022
More people in the United States are working two full-time jobs than ever before, says Lauren Kaori Gurley of The Washington Post.
"Most people who have the ability to work from home are probably making a little bit more money, whereas the people who were risking their lives and people who are bus drivers or people who are health care workers are really feeling the pinch right now," says Lauren Kaori Gurley of The Washington Post.
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

New gun control law puts emphasis on mental health

Jul 18, 2022
There's a disconnect between mental health funding and who actually commits mass shootings. The greatest effect may be on suicides.
The new law includes funding and legislation for mental health facilities. But only 3% to 5% of violent acts are committed by people with serious mental illnesses.
Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Slavery ended in the 1860s. Why hasn't the wealth gap closed for Black Americans?

Jun 20, 2022
Juneteenth commemorates Black Americans' emancipation from slavery, yet their economic emancipation continues.
Demonstrators marched Friday in Newark, New Jersey, to celebrate Juneteenth and demand reparations for Black Americans. Structural and legal barriers have limited Black people's opportunities to build wealth.
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Background check reforms could reduce gun violence. Does the new bipartisan framework deliver?

Jun 13, 2022
The deal in the Senate addresses some issues related to background checks, but a critical loophole is left untouched.
An activist at the March for Our Lives demonstration Saturday in New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Low wages and high costs clash in the home health care crisis for aging Americans

Apr 8, 2022
“We've never invested in the ability of families to afford the care that they need,” says Ai-jen Poo of the National Domestic Workers Alliance.
Baby boomers are retiring at a rate of 10,000 people per day, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
Daniel Leal-Olivas-Pool/Getty Images

Inside the ever-growing power of dark money in U.S. politics

"It's really everywhere," said Marketplace's Kimberly Adams.
"It's really everywhere," said Marketplace's Kimberly Adams.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images