David Brancaccio

Host and Senior Editor, Marketplace Morning Report

SHORT BIO

I’ve anchored and reported for Marketplace since 1989 from bases in London, Los Angeles and New York. Multimedia journalism’s my thing — been doing radio since I was a little boy. I write, love cameras and audio/video editing and have anchored television. I grew up in a small town in Maine but have attended schools in Italy, Madagascar and Ghana.

What was your first job?

DJ and newsman on WTVL AM/FM, Waterville, Maine.

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

Making each and every one fit. “Marketplace Morning Report” has to end at 58 minutes and 58 seconds past each hour; no more, no less.

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

Find your own voice in your on-air style and in your writing.

In your next life, what would your career be?

Astronaut. They say a key qualification for the Mars mission are folks who can fix things on the fly. I'm good at MacGyvering.

Fill in the blank: Money can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you ______.

A McIntosh audiophile-grade stereo amplifier. No, not spelled the same as the computer. They always were too expensive for me, and now they're even more expensive.

What is something that everyone should own, no matter how much it costs?

For those who shave, a shaving brush.  And kitchen scissors. Really. It'll change your life.

What’s something that you thought you knew but later found out you were wrong about?

I thought people work in their own best interests. They don't. They use up resources until they hurt themselves. "Tragedy of the commons," economists call it.

What’s your most memorable Marketplace moment?

Live on the air, I slipped and swapped an "f" for a "p" in some copy and looked up to see an empty control room. They were all on the floor laughing at my expense.

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

Besides the photo of my family, there is a 4" diameter, 4-foot-tall model rocket in the Marketplace Morning Report colors I built. It's flown to 4,000 feet.

Latest Stories (2,476)

Why more employers and businesses are considering the 4-day workweek

Marketplace senior economics contributor Chris Farrell joins us to discuss whether the four-day workweek could stick.
"What the research suggests is that if you thoughtfully cut back on hours during the week, you can boost employee well-being and maintain productivity," says Marketplace senior economics contributor Chris Farrell.
designer491 via Getty Images
"Truffle hunters told me one of their chief challenges is trying to figure out what to charge," said Rowan Jacobsen, author of "Truffle Hound."
Marco Bertorello/AFP/Getty Images

Are tech companies influencing politics more than governments?

Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group, believes we're increasingly becoming citizens of Facebook and Twitter rather than of nations.
Are we becoming citizens of tech?
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Revisiting location-based pay in this era of remote work

Companies are choosing to reduce the pay of remote workers who head to areas with a lower cost of living.
More companies are cutting down the pay of remote workers who choose to live in areas with a lower cost of living.
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Former execs at Safeway, Walgreens testify at trial of Theranos founder

Oct 14, 2021
Testimony from the former CEO of Safeway and the ex-CFO of Walgreens illuminates those companies' dealings with Elizabeth Holmes.
Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes arrives at the Robert F. Peckham Federal Building with her defense team on Aug. 31, 2021 in San Jose, California. Holmes is on trial after being indicted on multiple counts of fraud for misrepresenting her company's blood-testing technology.
Ethan Swope/Getty Images

An argument for bringing back a contractual "lottery" for retirement savings

Marketplace's Chris Farrell explains why a "tontine" could be used positively in retirement plans.
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What the Enron scandal taught us about investing

Sep 30, 2021
"To get the full return of the stock market, you have to invest in all the stocks available, not just your own," says The Wall Street Journal's Jason Zweig.
Enron employees leave the company's Houston headquarters after being laid off in 2001.
James Nielsen/Getty Images

20 years later, echoes of Enron's energy deregulation in California, Texas

Sep 30, 2021
In California, energy companies gamed the markets and ushered in large-scale blackouts in 2000-2001, incidents that have Enron's fingerprints all over them.
David McNew/Getty Images

How some entrepreneurs weathered the pandemic

Businesses have had to adapt to being fully online, and that has opened of a variety of opportunities.
Pivoting to online during the pandemic has opened up different paths for businesses to flourish.
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