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Rewriting construction rules

| Sep 9, 2005
Scott Tong reports that as gulf coast reconstruciton gets under way, the workers on the front lines may get a raw deal.

Farmers face a tough harvest

| Sep 9, 2005
As farmers upriver in the Midwest start the grain harvest, it's a race against time. Kevin Lavery from KWMU in St. Louis reports the grain belt is taking this disaster right on the heels of another.

The report from Houston

| Sep 9, 2005
the people most directly affected by Hurricane Katrina are in Baton Rouge. And Dallas. And Houston. They're trying to regain some normalcy. Marketplace's Bob Moon has been in Houston for the past week or so.

The new New Orleans

| Sep 9, 2005
Let's agree that New Orleans will be rebuilt, in the same spot. It will be the same city, but different. How different? Economist and commentator Marcellus Andrews says it may be The Big Disney.

The week on Wall Street

| Sep 9, 2005
Host Kai Ryssdal talks to analyst David Johnson about how Hurricane Katrina's aftermath may affect businesses along the gulf coast.

The outlook from Lower Manhattan

| Sep 9, 2005
This Sunday at Ground Zero families of those who died in the World Trade Center will read aloud the names of the dead. Kai Ryssdal talks to Pradnya Joshi, who has been covering the plans for the site for Newsday.

Elections in Germany

| Sep 9, 2005
German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder is rolling the political dice has called elections a year early. And on the 19th, many voters will go to the polls to vote for the Left Party. Kyle James reports from Berlin.

Looking for work in Houston

| Sep 9, 2005
New Orleans refugees are beginning to think about resettling. Bob Moon reports from Houston, where some are pounding the pavement.

Anatomy of a disaster

| Sep 9, 2005
Commentator Robert Guest was in Kobe, Japan when the 1995 earthquake devastated the city. He compares his experience there with what he's seen from New Orleans.

How to make the ports move

| Sep 9, 2005
The port of New Orleans needs a few good men (and women) to get up and running. Rachel Dornhelm reports.

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