Latest Stories

Latest Stories

How much money are supply chain disruptions costing companies?

Cyberattacks, trade disputes, the coronavirus, natural disasters — it is exceedingly difficult to manage a complex web of business relationships
To make supply chains more resilient, companies can digitize them, hold more inventory and simplify product designs, says Susan Lund of McKinsey. Pictured: Items being transferred at an automated logistics center in Shandong in China's eastern Qingdao province.
STR/AFP via Getty Images

1.2 million seek unemployment benefits after $600 federal check ends

Aug 6, 2020
It's evidence that the coronavirus keeps forcing companies to slash jobs just as the weekly federal jobless payment has expired.
The Labor Department’s report marked the 20th straight week that at least 1 million people have sought jobless aid. Pictured: A sign asking clients to wear a mask and respect social distancing is seen on the door of a closed store in Los Angeles.
Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

Trump administration moves past TikTok to take action on more Chinese tech companies

The rationale is that the U.S. needs "clean networks" to guard Americans’ data and the secrets of U.S. companies.
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has laid out an expansive plan to keep out entire categories of Chinese tech: apps, data storage, internet and phone services. Pictured: Pompeo speaks during a news conference at the State Department on Aug. 5, 2020.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

California weighs measure on single-use plastic

Aug 6, 2020
The Circular Economy bill is supported by hundreds of organizations. But the California Chamber of Commerce opposes it.
The bill would require 75% of single-use plastic packaging in California to be reduced or recycled into something else by the year 2030.
Carl Court/Getty Images

For Uber, a diverse business model is the key to weathering COVID-19

Aug 6, 2020
As its ride-sharing business declined, the company pivoted to delivery.
An Uber Eats delivery worker riding an electric scooter in New York City in March.
Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

Small towns brace for altered college football schedules

Aug 6, 2020
Business owners in Maryville, Missouri, and Baldwin City, Kansas, say college athletics help their bottom lines.
A Northwest Missouri State University football game in 2019 with a large crowd of spectators.
Greg Echlin

Accounting in the COVID era is more subjective than ever

Aug 5, 2020
Companies are finding ways to soften the pandemic's blow to their bottom lines.
An empty Wrigley Field in Chicago on what would have been Major League Baseball's opening day. Since Disney didn't air MLB games, it didn't have to count the licensing cost in its financial results.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

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California court to rule on gig worker classification

Aug 5, 2020
The issue has big implications for workers' access to safety net benefits that have become crucial during the pandemic.
A driver takes part in a caravan protest against Uber and Lyft in Los Angeles. For many ride-share drivers, unemployment insurance and other benefits are major issues.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

What’s CFIUS and what does it have to do with TikTok?

Aug 5, 2020
The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States screens deals for national security risks.
As the future of TikTok in the United States is in limbo, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's statement on removing untrusted Chinese apps makes it more confusing for Chinese technology companies operating in the U.S, like Lenovo.

For some caregiver positions, only coronavirus survivors need apply

Aug 5, 2020
As families turn to nannies for child care, some are screening candidates by whether they've had COVID-19, hoping they won't bring the virus into the home.
More parents are turning to child care providers who have had the coronavirus. Survivors may be immune to new infection, the thinking goes.
Cindy Ord/Getty Images