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From This Collection

10 years after Katrina

Charters transform New Orleans schools, and teachers

by David Brancaccio and Katie Long Aug 12, 2015
Why the city's instructors are younger, whiter and less traditionally trained.
10 years after Katrina

The story of New Orleans' recovery in one business

by David Brancaccio and Katie Long Aug 11, 2015
8 1/2 years after Katrina, Circle Food reopened. Get your green bell peppers here!
10 years after Katrina

A public housing project reborn in New Orleans

by Caitlin Esch Aug 10, 2015
Ambitious mixed-income development with an emphasis on education has its critics.
The former St. Bernard housing project, which was flooded during Hurricane Katrina, has been replaced by Columbia Parc at the Bayou District.
Mario Tama/Getty Images
10 years after Katrina

How independent businesses kept New Orleans afloat

by David Brancaccio and Katie Long Aug 10, 2015
After Katrina, small retailers shook off the devastation and got back to work.
10 years after Katrina

A small credit union brings Hope to New Orleans

by Caitlin Esch Aug 5, 2015
Its investment in low-income communities helped the area rebuild after Katrina.
Bill Bynum, the CEO of Hope Credit Union, at his office in Jackson, Mississippi.
Caitlin Esch/Marketplace
10 years after Katrina

Banking on a New Orleans recovery

by Caitlin Esch Aug 4, 2015
When New Orleans flooded, Liberty Bank — itself devastated — helped to rebuild.
Alden McDonald, (left) President and CEO of Liberty Bank, walks the perimeter of a branch under construction in New Orleans' Gentilly neighborhood, with his son Todd McDonald, a Vice President of Strategic Management at Liberty.
Caitlin Esch