Sabri Ben-Achour

Correspondent & Host

SHORT BIO

My job is to do what I can to help all of us understand the economic forces that shape our lives and our world.

What was your first job?

I was a waiter!

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

It can be hard to break down complex topics quickly and fairly.

In your next life, what would your career be?

A chemist or a geneticist, I think.

What’s your most memorable Marketplace moment?

Playing with giant horseshoe crabs under the moonlight as they swam ashore to spawn. (It was for a story on how their blood is used in the medical industry).

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

My plants. I water them when I'm stressed. They get a lot of water.

Latest Stories (399)

There's little public consensus on how to tackle inflation, new poll shows

Jul 4, 2022
The public is "at odds with expert opinion and traditional policymaking," says Eric Plutzer of the McCourtney Institute for Democracy.
When pressed about fighting inflation, survey participants say they want to hold the line on prices for essentials, says Eric Plutzer of the McCourtney Institute for Democracy. But "those policies require the Congress and the president to work together."
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

What do different measures of inflation tell us?

Jun 30, 2022
The PCE and CPI measure different things, but the message they send to consumers may influence expectations — that then can affect inflation.
One thing that can really mess with what inflation is doing? What consumers think inflation will do.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Chinese group faked social media posts against a planned Texas rare-earth metal plant, researchers say

Jun 29, 2022
China produces the majority of the world's rare-earth metals. It's likely trying to maintain its control of global production, researchers say.
The disinformation campaign, if sponsored by the Chinese government, would mark a departure from previous efforts that have been more political in nature.
Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Odds of a recession rising but vary widely

Jun 21, 2022
There is a very real chance that the country may end up paying a price for getting inflation under control. That price is recession.
Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

Western countries may have a hard time confiscating Russian assets they've frozen

Jun 17, 2022
Some say that part of the money to rebuild Ukraine should come from confiscating frozen Russian assets. But that path could be fraught with practical and legal difficulties.
Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a government meeting via a video link.
Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images

Retail sales dip may be lined with silver

Jun 15, 2022
The slight decline from April to May could indicate a slowing economy — which the Federal Reserve is hoping for.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

We're saving less. Will we spend less?

Jun 14, 2022
After reaching a record high of nearly 34% early in the pandemic, the savings rate has dipped below its pre-pandemic level.
Travelers board a train in Washington, D.C. Partially fueled by pent-up demand for services, consumers are spending down their savings.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The chaotic story of inventory in today's economy

Jun 8, 2022
Wholesale inventories were up in April. But now, some stores have too much inventory while others struggle to get the inventory they need.
Target is among the retailers that misjudged what consumers would buy and are dealing  with stockpiles of unwanted goods.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Biden moves to restore stability of U.S. solar industry

Jun 7, 2022
The president also ruled out solar tariffs for two years on several Asian countries the U.S. imports solar panels from.
Chinese workers producing parts for solar panels. The U.S. has been investigating whether Southeast Asian nations have been laundering Chinese panels, which carry U.S. import tariffs.
STR/AFP via Getty Images

Millions have joined the labor force in the past year

Jun 3, 2022
About 3.5 million more people were working or looking for work in May than a year earlier. Economists hope the number keeps rising.
"Most people who have the ability to work from home are probably making a little bit more money, whereas the people who were risking their lives and people who are bus drivers or people who are health care workers are really feeling the pinch right now," says Lauren Kaori Gurley of The Washington Post.
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images