Candace Manriquez Wrenn

Director/producer

SHORT BIO

I direct and produce live broadcasts of “Marketplace Morning Report.” That means I deal with people and sound, and come game time, I make sure the show airs on time.

What was your first job?

My very first job was as a carhop at a Sonic Drive-Thru in Cedar Hill, Texas. I wore skates and everything.

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

From my experience, some people think that the “Morning Report” is recorded. It is NOT. As such, I am up at 1 a.m. to get the first American broadcast on air at 3:51 a.m. PST.

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

Don't worry about attaining a fancy degree. Having passion and principles can take you far. (BTW, neither of my degrees are fancy).

Fill in the blank: Money can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you ______.

Breathing room. Whether you have millions in the bank or just enough to get by if a serious life event happens, money can give you such psychological peace.

 

Latest Stories (76)

Athletes protest police shooting of Jacob Blake by refusing to play

Kenneth Shropshire called Wednesday a "universally unique day in history and in sport."
The Milwaukee Bucks, scheduled to play against the Orlando Magic in the NBA playoffs Wednesday, decided not to play to take a stand against the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Wisconsin.
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Universal basic income, blockchain and more: Reimagining the next decade

"If people don't have money in their pockets, then this type of economy that we have can't work," says Wharton professor Mauro Guillén.
Mauro Guillén says that the future uses of blockchain, the underlying technology for cryptocurrencies, include incentivizing "prosocial behavior" like energy conservation.
Petras Malukas/AFP via Getty Images

Boston Fed president: We need fiscal policy until pandemic is under control

Eric Rosengren says that the Fed's Main Street Lending Program started off slow, but interest in borrowing has increased.
The Federal Reserve is doing its part to help support businesses with a pile of money to lend to small- and medium-sized operations.
Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images

Kat Cole's vision for a kinder capitalism

The president and COO of Focus Brands says "caring for connected stakeholders — employees, customers, vendors" is where our economic system is going.
Kat Cole, president and COO of Focus Brands, supports stakeholders, not just shareholders.
Paul Morigi/Getty Images

Should we treat internet service like a public utility?

The idea is that internet is not a luxury, but a fundamental part of participating in the economy.
The digital divide is more obvious than ever, as tens of millions of Americans still don't have access to reliable high-speed internet.
Sandra Mu/Getty Images

A tax on red meat is imminent, researchers say

For years, analysts have been working to find financial tools for curbing certain behaviors.
"Everybody has to pay for climate damages, and many people in the states have to pay privately for health care. So it would make much more sense if they saw those costs in the prices of foods that are really related to those impacts," Marco Springmann says.
Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

How to grieve the old economy

Kimberly Adams talks to Megan Devine, psychotherapist and author of "It’s OK That You’re Not OK," about grieving the old economy.
A trader reacts during the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange on Friday as markets continue to drop from COVID-19 uncertainty.
Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

The future of education is digital, online learning platform CEO says

Online enrollments at Coursera are up 500% from the same time a year ago, says CEO Jeff Maggioncalda.
Coursera CEO Jeff Maggioncalda says a class on the science of well-being is the most popular on the platform right now. "Very job-relevant, practical courses seem to be the ones that most people are turning to."
iStock/Getty Images

Young people see transformational change as the best way forward

Majorities of young people, independent of race, perceive problems with systemic racism and systemic discrimination, according to the GenForward survey.
"We have an understanding of systemic racism and policing, political alienation and economic precarity that exists among millennials and Gen-Zers," Cathy Cohen said.
Getty Images

Why the U.S. government would sell bonds that don't need to be paid back

It could help the federal government deal with the debt mountain it's amassing from COVID-19 spending.
Long-term bonds would help the Treasury borrow while locking in the current low interest rates.
Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images