What have you always wondered about the economy? Tell Us
COVID-19

London guide battles lockdown blues with virtual tours

Victoria Craig Mar 24, 2020
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Look Up London's Katie Wignall has found a way to keep guiding through the crisis: virtual tours. Courtesy Katie Wignall
COVID-19

London guide battles lockdown blues with virtual tours

Victoria Craig Mar 24, 2020
Look Up London's Katie Wignall has found a way to keep guiding through the crisis: virtual tours. Courtesy Katie Wignall
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Monday night enlisted the country’s residents to suit up in the battle against COVID-19.

Unlike in wars of the past, though, marching orders this time were simple: Stay at home.

Residents are only allowed to leave their homes for essential shopping trips, to exercise outside once per day and to travel to work if it’s absolutely necessary.

That now means most people are working from home, most shops are closed and only the likes of grocery stores, pharmacies and restaurants are allowed to operate.

For Katie Wignall, founder of tour company Look Up London, that could be a devastating blow to her business.

But, she’s found a way to keep guiding through the crisis: virtual tours.

Using the street view on Google Maps, her own photos and extensive knowledge about London history, Katie walks people virtually through both some of the city’s well-known and lesser-known sites. She’s garnered thousands of views on tours of Covent Garden, Guild Hall and Tower Hill.

Katie explained how she got the idea to move her business all online ⁠— at least temporarily ⁠— to the BBC’s Victoria Craig on the global edition of the Marketplace Morning Report. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

Katie Wignall: When I posted saying I was explaining and rescheduling all of the walking tours, I had a lot of lovely feedback from people saying they were going to miss the tours. And I kind of felt like, “There has to be a way now with technology that we can keep the tours going.”

Victoria Craig: You had people from all over the world ⁠— Frankfurt, Israel, Brazil, D.C., South Africa ⁠— on your first tour, didn’t you?

Katie Wignall: Yes, it was amazing. Someone from Taiwan, someone from Tasmania. I think what people really felt was in that time they were along for the virtual tour, they were really connected and just able to, for 20 to 30 minutes, just forget about whatever they were focusing on before and enjoy a bit of London history. What I’m trying to do is encourage people, who might be tempted to go outside, to stay home, but still  feel a little closer to the outdoors.

“What I’m trying to do is encourage people, who might be tempted to go outside, to stay home, but still feel a little closer to the outdoors.”

Katie Wignall, Look Up London

Victoria Craig:  This is a great innovation for your businesses, but we’re also talking about livelihood. You run walking tours all over London every day. So without being able to do that anymore, are you able to make a little bit of money, at least, doing these virtual tours?

Katie Wignall: People have been incredibly generous. I’ve been overwhelmed with donations that people have been sending over PayPal. I definitely see the potential of doing virtual walks, and I think it could be a really exciting time actually to see how this changes things.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What’s the outlook for vaccine supply?

Chief executives of America’s COVID-19 vaccine makers promised in congressional testimony to deliver the doses promised to the U.S. government by summer. The projections of confidence come after months of supply chain challenges and companies falling short of year-end projections for 2020. What changed? In part, drugmakers that normally compete are now actually helping one another. This has helped solve several supply chain issues, but not all of them.

How has the pandemic changed scientific research?

Over the past year, while some scientists turned their attention to COVID-19 and creating vaccines to fight it, most others had to pause their research — and re-imagine how to do it. Social distancing, limited lab capacity — “It’s less fun, I have to say. Like, for me the big part of the science is discussing the science with other people, getting excited about projects,” said Isabella Rauch, an immunologist at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. Funding is also a big question for many.

What happened to all of the hazard pay essential workers were getting at the beginning of the pandemic?

Almost a year ago, when the pandemic began, essential workers were hailed as heroes. Back then, many companies gave hazard pay, an extra $2 or so per hour, for coming in to work. That quietly went away for most of them last summer. Without federal action, it’s mostly been up to local governments to create programs and mandates. They’ve helped compensate front-line workers, but they haven’t been perfect. “The solutions are small. They’re piecemeal,” said Molly Kinder at the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program. “You’re seeing these innovative pop-ups because we have failed overall to do something systematically.”

Read More

Collapse

Marketplace is on a mission.

We believe Main Street matters as much as Wall Street, economic news is made relevant and real through human stories, and a touch of humor helps enliven topics you might typically find…well, dull.

Through the signature style that only Marketplace can deliver, we’re on a mission to raise the economic intelligence of the country—but we don’t do it alone. We count on listeners and readers like you to keep this public service free and accessible to all. Will you become a partner in our mission today?

Your donation is critical to the future of public service journalism. Support our work today – for as little as $5 – and help us keep making people smarter.