Now that Uber and Lyft are public, the public may pay more

Erika Beras Aug 9, 2019
HTML EMBED:
COPY
A car that drives for both Uber and Lyft is seen on Park Avenue in New York City in March, 2019. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

Now that Uber and Lyft are public, the public may pay more

Erika Beras Aug 9, 2019
A car that drives for both Uber and Lyft is seen on Park Avenue in New York City in March, 2019. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Uber and Lyft, the two big competing ride-sharing companies, posted lower-than-expected revenue in their respective earnings reports this week. Each went public earlier this year. As the companies adjust to their new status, they may find that the financial pressure of being beholden to shareholders could mean changes in pricing strategies and branding.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

We’re here to help you navigate this changed world and economy.

Our mission at Marketplace is to raise the economic intelligence of the country. It’s a tough task, but it’s never been more important.

In the past year, we’ve seen record unemployment, stimulus bills, and reddit users influencing the stock market. Marketplace helps you understand it all, will fact-based, approachable, and unbiased reporting.

Generous support from listeners and readers is what powers our nonprofit news—and your donation today will help provide this essential service. For just $5/month, you can sustain independent journalism that keeps you and thousands of others informed.