Economics of Disaster

Following the hurricane, recovery in Puerto Rico takes different forms

Marketplace Weekend Staff Apr 27, 2018
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Clockwise from top left: Juan Orta says he's spent $75,000 of his own money to reopen his convenience store in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico; Cows at Vaqueria Ceiba del Mar in Hatillo, Puerto Rico; Luis Martinez, owner of Ceiba del Mar; Glorimar Rivera who lives on a street that was once covered in power lines and fallen poles. Peter Balonon-Rosen/Marketplace
Economics of Disaster

Following the hurricane, recovery in Puerto Rico takes different forms

Marketplace Weekend Staff Apr 27, 2018
Clockwise from top left: Juan Orta says he's spent $75,000 of his own money to reopen his convenience store in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico; Cows at Vaqueria Ceiba del Mar in Hatillo, Puerto Rico; Luis Martinez, owner of Ceiba del Mar; Glorimar Rivera who lives on a street that was once covered in power lines and fallen poles. Peter Balonon-Rosen/Marketplace
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Seven months after Hurricane Maria, people are still putting pieces of their lives back together. Across the island that takes plenty of different forms. As power, access to clean water and business opportunities slowly come back to Puerto Rico, people have been spending a lot of money, in plenty of different ways. We revisit a dairy farmer, a convenience store owner, a homeowner and a community center to see where things stand with recovery after the hurricane. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

We’re here to help you navigate this changed world and economy.

Our mission at Marketplace is to raise the economic intelligence of the country. It’s a tough task, but it’s never been more important.

In the past year, we’ve seen record unemployment, stimulus bills, and reddit users influencing the stock market. Marketplace helps you understand it all, will fact-based, approachable, and unbiased reporting.

Generous support from listeners and readers is what powers our nonprofit news—and your donation today will help provide this essential service. For just $5/month, you can sustain independent journalism that keeps you and thousands of others informed.