Share on
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Share on
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Share on
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Share on
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Share on
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Share on
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace
Share on
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Share on
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Share on
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Share on
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Share on
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

What you need to know about Larry Kudlow

Kimberly Adams Mar 14, 2018
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
White House National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow calls on reporters during a briefing about the upcoming G7 meetings in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House June 6, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

It was only last week that White House chief economic adviser Gary Cohn announced he was leaving the White House after losing the battle on steel and aluminum tariffs. Today, we’ve gotten news of his replacement: Economist and CNBC contributor Larry Kudlow. Here’s what you need to know about him:

He’s not just a TV/radio personality.

Kudlow is mostly known now for his radio show and his work on CNBC. But he’s spent time in government and on Wall Street. Most recently, he was in the Office of Management and Budget during the Reagan administration. He started his career at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. He was also chief economist and senior managing director at Bear Stearns, but left long before the investment bank’s collapse

He’s unlikely to be a yes-man.

Less than two weeks ago, Kudlow shared a byline on an opinion piece urging President Donald Trump to reconsider his steel and aluminum tariffs. “President Trump genuinely believes that his steel and aluminum tariffs will save thousands of blue collar jobs,” he wrote alongside Arthur B. Laffer and Stephen Moore. “… But even if tariffs save every one of the 140,000 or so steel jobs in America, it puts at risk 5 million manufacturing and related jobs in industries that use steel.”

However, after accepting the job, Kudlow told the Associated Press that even though he opposes the tariffs, he is “in accord with [Trump’s] policies.” And Trump himself has said that he likes a variety of opinions. Trump is bringing in someone he knows will challenge him.

He’s a free market and supply side kind of guy.

His website bio says it all. He also a big fan of tax cuts and reduced regulations.

He’s got a paper trail. And a broadcast one, too.

Kudlow has been in the media for so long, we know where he stands on a host of economic issues. And that gives him something Wall Street can take to the bank: A bit of predictability in the White House.

How We Survive
How We Survive
Climate change is here. Experts say we need to adapt. This series explores the role of technology in helping humanity weather the changes ahead.